ElShamah - Reason & Science: Defending ID and the Christian Worldview
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ElShamah - Reason & Science: Defending ID and the Christian Worldview

Otangelo Grasso: This is my library, where I collect information and present arguments developed by myself that lead, in my view, to the Christian faith, creationism, and Intelligent Design as the best explanation for the origin of the physical world.


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Is the Shroud of Turin a forgery ?

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1Is the Shroud of Turin a forgery ? Empty Is the Shroud of Turin a forgery ? Sat 8 Apr 2023 - 21:45

Otangelo


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Is the Shroud of Turin a forgery?

Many objections have been raised, attempting to debunk the claim that the Shroud of Turin is the authentic burial cloth of Jesus, and claiming that the cloth is a forgery.  So in this video, I will present the most common arguments asserting that the Shroud is not the burial cloth of Jesus, and will examine if these claims withstand scrutiny.

Carbon dating: One of the most significant arguments against the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin is the results of carbon dating tests that were conducted in 1988. Three independent laboratories performed radiocarbon dating on the shroud and concluded that it originated from the Middle Ages (between 1260 and 1390 AD), which would make it a medieval forgery rather than an artifact from the time of Jesus Christ.

The carbon dating results from the 1988 tests are often cited as a significant argument against the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin because they provide a direct scientific measurement that places the shroud's origin in the Middle Ages, specifically between 1260 and 1390 AD. This finding challenges the belief that the shroud could be a relic from the time of Jesus Christ, as it suggests that it was created much later in history.

The carbon dating tests were conducted by three independent laboratories using radiocarbon dating, which is a widely accepted scientific method for dating organic materials. The results were consistent across all three laboratories and indicated a medieval date range, leading many to question the shroud's authenticity.

The dating results have been viewed as significant because they provide a concrete, scientific measurement that contradicts the claims of those who believe the shroud to be an authentic relic of Jesus. It suggests that the shroud may have been intentionally created as a forgery during the medieval period, using techniques available at that time.

There have been criticisms and controversies surrounding the carbon dating tests, including concerns about the methodology, sample selection, and potential contamination. Some proponents of the authenticity of the shroud argue that these issues may have affected the dating results and that further research is needed to fully understand the shroud's origins. Nevertheless, the carbon dating results remain one of the most commonly cited arguments against the authenticity of the Shroud of Turin.

There have been several criticisms against the methodology of the carbon dating tests conducted on the Shroud of Turin. Some of the most common criticisms include:

Sample selection: Critics have argued that the samples used for carbon dating were not representative of the entire shroud and may not have been taken from the original cloth. The samples were reportedly taken from an edge of the shroud, which could have been subject to different environmental conditions and potential contamination compared to the main body of the cloth.

the medieval repair one, the bio-contamination one, and the carbon monoxide one.


The Savoy family ruled over the region of Turin in Italy for several centuries. The exact time period during which the Savoy family held power in Turin can be traced from the late Middle Ages to the 19th century.




Savoy family, who ruled over the region of Turin in Italy during that time period. For example, in the late 16th century, Duke Emmanuel Philibert of Savoy ordered the Shroud to be transferred from Chambery, France, to Turin, Italy, where it has been kept since then.

King Umberto II of Italy, whose family used to own the shroud, says that in 1694 they repaired the shroud's heavily frayed and missing edges.  In the past, the edges of the Lenzuoli (Sheet) had become so tattered as to cause embarrassment or criticism of the Custodians, and those areas were repaired and rewoven, attempting to blend the new sections in, as best possible, with the original fabric.  









Contamination: There are concerns that the shroud may have been contaminated over the centuries, which could have affected the accuracy of the carbon dating results. The Shroud of Turin has been exposed to numerous handling, storage, and display conditions throughout its history, which may have introduced carbon-containing materials or altered the original carbon content of the cloth.

Conservation treatment: The shroud has undergone several conservation treatments over the years, including exposure to preservatives, cleaning agents, and other chemicals that could have introduced carbon-containing materials or altered the carbon content of the cloth. Critics have argued that these treatments may have affected the accuracy of the carbon dating results.

Reparation and reweaving: Some researchers have suggested that the shroud may have been repaired or rewoven in certain areas, which could have affected the accuracy of the carbon dating results. Reweaving is a technique used to repair damaged textiles, and if done using modern materials, it could have introduced carbon-containing materials that would affect the dating results.

Inhomogeneity of the cloth: The Shroud of Turin is a complex textile made of linen, and there are concerns that the cloth may not be homogeneous in terms of its carbon content. It's possible that different parts of the shroud may have aged differently or may have been subjected to different environmental conditions, which could affect the accuracy of the carbon dating results.





Lack of historical evidence: There is no historical evidence that directly links the Shroud of Turin to Jesus Christ or the first century. The first reliable historical record of the shroud appears in the mid-14th century, and its origin before that time is largely speculative and based on circumstantial evidence.

Artistic techniques: Some argue that the artistic techniques used in the depiction of the face and body on the shroud are consistent with medieval artistic styles, suggesting that it could have been created using techniques available during the Middle Ages.

Lack of biblical and theological support: There is no mention of a burial shroud with a detailed image of Jesus in the Bible or other early Christian texts. This has led some scholars and theologians to question the authenticity of the shroud and suggest that it may be a later artistic creation rather than a relic from Jesus' time.

Reproducibility: Despite numerous attempts to reproduce the image on the shroud using various techniques, including painting, scorching, and chemical reactions, no one has been able to create an image that exactly matches the characteristics of the Shroud of Turin, leading some to believe that the image may have been created through non-authentic means.

Lack of chain of custody: The Shroud of Turin's exact history and chain of custody is unclear for many centuries, and there are gaps in its provenance. Some argue that the lack of a clear and documented chain of custody raises questions about its authenticity and reliability as a historical artifact.

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