ElShamah - Reason & Science: Defending ID and the Christian Worldview
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ElShamah - Reason & Science: Defending ID and the Christian Worldview

Otangelo Grasso: This is my library, where I collect information and present arguments developed by myself that lead, in my view, to the Christian faith, creationism, and Intelligent Design as the best explanation for the origin of the physical world.


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Angels mentioned in the Bible

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1Angels mentioned in the Bible Empty Angels mentioned in the Bible Fri 10 Mar 2023 - 13:00

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Angels mentioned in the Bible

Genesis

Genesis 3:24

"After he drove the man out, he placed on the east side of the Garden of Eden cherubim and a flaming sword flashing back and forth to guard the way to the tree of life." Cherubim are sometimes understood as angelic beings, although their exact nature is not fully clear.

Mission:

The beings referred to as cherubim are often understood to have been angelic beings. Their mission/task in this passage was to guard the way to the tree of life after Adam and Eve were expelled from the Garden of Eden. Genesis 3:24 says, "After he drove the man out, he placed on the east side of the Garden of Eden cherubim and a flaming sword flashing back and forth to guard the way to the tree of life." The cherubim's task was to ensure that Adam and Eve did not re-enter the garden and eat from the tree of life, which would grant them immortality. By guarding the way to the tree of life, the cherubim were fulfilling God's command and preventing humans from accessing the tree and the immortality it offered.

Lesson: 

The episode in Genesis 3, which includes the mention of the cherubim, teaches several important lessons. One key lesson is the consequences of disobedience to God's commands. Adam and Eve were banished from the Garden of Eden and lost access to the tree of life because they disobeyed God's command not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. The cherubim's task of guarding the way to the tree of life underscores the gravity of their disobedience and the importance of following God's commands. Another lesson that can be drawn from this episode is the reality of sin and its impact on humanity. The fall of humanity described in Genesis 3 is the origin of sin in the world, which has had far-reaching consequences for all of humanity. The cherubim's task of guarding the way to the tree of life serves as a reminder of the devastating impact of sin and the need for repentance and redemption. Finally, the episode in Genesis 3 underscores the mercy of God. Despite Adam and Eve's disobedience, God provides them with clothing and promises a future deliverance from the effects of sin. The mention of the cherubim guarding the way to the tree of life reminds us of God's mercy in limiting the consequences of humanity's sin and offering a path toward redemption.

References:

There are a few other verses in the Bible that refer back to the story of Adam and Eve's expulsion from the Garden of Eden as described in Genesis 3:24. Here are a few examples:

Revelation 2:7: "Whoever has ears, let them hear what the Spirit says to the churches. To the one who is victorious, I will give the right to eat from the tree of life, which is in the paradise of God." This verse refers to the "tree of life" mentioned in Genesis 3:24, but it also speaks of a future time when believers will be able to eat from the tree of life in the paradise of God.

Ezekiel 28:14-16: "You were anointed as a guardian cherub, for so I ordained you. You were on the holy mount of God; you walked among the fiery stones. You were blameless in your ways from the day you were created till wickedness was found in you. Through your widespread trade you were filled with violence, and you sinned. So I drove you in disgrace from the mount of God, and I expelled you, guardian cherub, from among the fiery stones." This passage is not directly related to Genesis 3:24, but it does mention the role of the "guardian cherub" and could be seen as an allusion to the story of Adam and Eve.

Hebrews 9:24: "For Christ did not enter a sanctuary made with human hands that was only a copy of the true one; he entered heaven itself, now to appear for us in God’s presence." This verse speaks of Christ's entrance into heaven, which could be seen as a parallel to the cherubim guarding the entrance to the Garden of Eden. Just as the cherubim prevented Adam and Eve from returning to the garden, Christ's entrance into heaven paves the way for believers to enter into God's presence.

Genesis 16:7-14

"The angel of the Lord found Hagar near a spring in the desert; it was the spring that is beside the road to Shur. And he said, 'Hagar, slave of Sarai, where have you come from, and where are you going?' 'I’m running away from my mistress Sarai,' she answered. Then the angel of the Lord told her, 'Go back to your mistress and submit to her.' The angel added, 'I will increase your descendants so much that they will be too numerous to count.' The angel of the Lord also said to her: 'You are now pregnant and you will give birth to a son. You shall name him Ishmael, for the Lord has heard of your misery. He will be a wild donkey of a man; his hand will be against everyone and everyone’s hand against him, and he will live in hostility toward all his brothers.' She gave this name to the Lord who spoke to her: 'You are the God who sees me,' for she said, 'I have now seen the One who sees me.'"

What was the task/mission of the angel? 

In Genesis 16:7-14, the function of the angel of the Lord was to provide guidance, comfort, and assurance to Hagar, who was fleeing from her mistress Sarai, the wife of Abram. The angel instructed Hagar to return to her mistress and submit to her, and promised that her descendants would be numerous. The angel also revealed to Hagar that she would give birth to a son and instructed her to name him Ishmael. The angel's message to Hagar shows that God was watching over her and had a plan for her and her future child, despite her difficult circumstances. The encounter with the angel also resulted in Hagar's recognition of God's presence and care in her life.

What lesson can be drawn from this episode?

God sees and cares for the oppressed: Hagar was a slave who had been mistreated by her mistress Sarai. However, God saw her plight and sent an angel to comfort and guide her.
God has a plan for each of us: Despite Hagar's difficult circumstances, the angel revealed to her that she would give birth to a son and that her descendants would be numerous. This shows that God has a plan for each of us, even when we are facing challenging situations.
God's promises are trustworthy: The angel promised Hagar that her descendants would be too numerous to count, and this promise was fulfilled when Ishmael became the father of a great nation.
Obedience leads to blessings: The angel instructed Hagar to return to her mistress and submit to her, and Hagar obeyed. As a result, she was blessed with a son and became the mother of a great nation.
God is present even in the midst of our struggles: Hagar recognized that God had seen her and cared for her, even in the midst of her difficult circumstances. This is a reminder that God is present with us even in the midst of our struggles and challenges.

Undesigned coincidence in  Genesis 16:7-14

In Genesis 16:7-14, the angel of the Lord finds Hagar by a spring of water in the wilderness and tells her to return to her mistress and submit to her. The angel also tells Hagar that her son will be named Ishmael and that he will be a wild donkey of a man, living in hostility toward all his brothers. Hagar then calls the Lord who spoke to her "the God who sees," saying that she has seen Him and that He has seen her. The undesigned coincidence involves an apparent reference to this event in Genesis 21:14-19, when Hagar and her son are sent away from Abraham's household by Sarah. After running out of water in the wilderness, Hagar puts Ishmael under a bush and moves away from him, unable to bear seeing him die. In verse 17, the angel of the Lord appears to Hagar and asks her, "What is the matter, Hagar? Do not be afraid; God has heard the boy crying as he lies there."
The coincidence lies in the fact that the angel's words to Hagar in Genesis 21:17, "God has heard the boy crying as he lies there," seem to explain why Hagar called the Lord "the God who sees" in Genesis 16:13. In other words, Hagar's name for God in Genesis 16:13 makes sense in light of the angel's statement in Genesis 21:17, which suggests that God had indeed seen and heard Ishmael's distress in the wilderness. This coincidence suggests that the events described in both passages are historically accurate and were not fabricated or invented later on.

Genesis 18:1-2 

"The Lord appeared to Abraham near the great trees of Mamre while he was sitting at the entrance to his tent in the heat of the day. Abraham looked up and saw three men standing nearby. When he saw them, he hurried from the entrance of his tent to meet them and bowed low to the ground."

What was the mission of the angel?

These three men were angels sent by God to deliver an important message to Abraham and Sarah.
To confirm God's promise: The angels came to confirm the promise that God had made to Abraham and Sarah about having a son in their old age. The angels told Abraham that Sarah would have a son, which reassured them of God's faithfulness.
To bring judgment: The angels also came to bring judgment on the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, which were wicked and had angered God. The angels informed Abraham of God's plans to destroy the cities, and Abraham interceded on behalf of the righteous people who lived there.
To provide hospitality: The angels allowed themselves to be welcomed by Abraham and Sarah and received their hospitality. In this way, the angels also modeled for Abraham and Sarah the importance of showing hospitality and kindness to others.

References in the Bible to Genesis 18:1-2

Hebrews 13:2 - "Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to angels without knowing it." This passage is often interpreted as a reference to the visitation of the angels to Abraham in Genesis 18.
Genesis 19:1 - "The two angels arrived at Sodom in the evening, and Lot was sitting in the gateway of the city." This passage describes the arrival of the two angels to Sodom, which is believed to be the same two angels who visited Abraham in Genesis 18.
Luke 24:4 - "While they were wondering about this, suddenly two men in clothes that gleamed like lightning stood beside them." This passage describes the appearance of two angels at the tomb of Jesus after His resurrection, and the phrase "two men" is often interpreted as a reference to the two angels who visited Abraham in Genesis 18.

These references suggest that the visitation of the LORD and two angels to Abraham in Genesis 18 is an important and memorable event in the Bible, and that it is often used as a symbol of God's presence and grace.

Genesis 18:16-22

"When the men got up to leave, they looked down toward Sodom, and Abraham walked along with them to see them on their way. Then the Lord said, 'Shall I hide from Abraham what I am about to do? Abraham will surely become a great and powerful nation, and all nations on earth will be blessed through him. For I have chosen him, so that he will direct his children and his household after him to keep the way of the Lord by doing what is right and just, so that the Lord will bring about for Abraham what he has promised him.' Then the Lord said, 'The outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah is so great and their sin so grievous that I will go down and see if what they have done is as bad as the outcry that has reached me. If not, I will know.' The men turned away and went toward Sodom, but Abraham stood before the Lord."

What was the mission of the angel?

In Genesis 18:16-22, the function of the angel is to deliver a message of judgment to Abraham regarding the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah. The three men who appeared to Abraham in the previous verses were actually angels, and one of them stayed behind to speak with Abraham while the other two went on to Sodom.

The angel's function in this passage was to inform Abraham of God's plan to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah because of their great wickedness. The angel shared with Abraham the outcry against the cities and how their sin had become so great that it had reached God's ears.

Abraham then interceded on behalf of the righteous people who might be living in those cities, asking if God would spare the cities if there were just 50 righteous people in them. The angel agreed, and Abraham continued to bargain down the number until he asked if God would spare the cities if there were only ten righteous people in them.

The angel's function in this passage was therefore to convey God's plan of judgment, as well as to allow Abraham the opportunity to intercede and appeal for mercy on behalf of the righteous people who might be living in those cities. Ultimately, the angel's message confirmed the righteousness of God's judgment and also showed the importance of intercessory prayer.

Lessons:

The seriousness of sin: The story of Sodom and Gomorrah serves as a warning about the seriousness of sin and the consequences that can result from a society's moral decay.
God's mercy and justice: While God was just in His decision to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, He also showed mercy to those who were righteous. This demonstrates that God is both just and merciful.
The power of intercessory prayer: Abraham's intercession on behalf of the righteous people in the cities serves as a powerful example of the importance of prayer and the role it can play in God's plans and purposes.
The need for righteousness: The story emphasizes the importance of righteousness and the fact that God will spare the righteous from judgment. It encourages us to strive for righteousness in our own lives and to pray for the righteousness of others.
God's desire for relationship: The fact that God engaged in conversation with Abraham and allowed him to intercede on behalf of the cities shows God's desire for relationship and communication with His people.

References:

Genesis 19:1-29 - This passage describes the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and the rescue of Lot and his family by the two angels.

2 Peter 2:6-8 - "if he condemned the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah by burning them to ashes, and made them an example of what is going to happen to the ungodly; and if he rescued Lot, a righteous man, who was distressed by the depraved conduct of the lawless (for that righteous man, living among them day after day, was tormented in his righteous soul by the lawless deeds he saw and heard)—" This passage references the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and the rescue of Lot, highlighting the righteousness of Lot and the consequences of ungodliness.

Luke 17:28-29 - "It was the same in the days of Lot. People were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building. But the day Lot left Sodom, fire and sulfur rained down from heaven and destroyed them all." This passage references the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and the warning to be prepared for the coming of the Son of Man.

These references highlight the importance of righteousness and the consequences of sin, as well as the mercy and justice of God. They also demonstrate how events and themes in the Bible are often interconnected and build upon each other to convey a message of faith and salvation.

Genesis 19:1-22

"The two angels arrived at Sodom in the evening, and Lot was sitting in the gateway of the city. When he saw them, he got up to meet them and bowed down with his face to the ground. 'My lords,' he said, 'please turn aside to your servant’s house. You can wash your feet and spend the night and then go on your way early in the morning.' 'No,' they answered, 'we will spend the night in the square.' But he insisted so strongly that they did go with him and entered his house. He prepared a meal for them, baking bread without yeast, and they ate. Before they had gone to bed, all the men from every part of the city of Sodom—both young and old—surrounded the house. They called to Lot, 'Where are the men who came to you tonight? Bring them out to us so that we can have sex with them.' Lot went outside to meet them and shut the door behind him and said, 'No, my friends. Don’t do this wicked thing. Look, I have two daughters who have never

What was the mission of the angel?

In Genesis 19:1-22, the mission of the two angels who visited Lot in Sodom was to deliver a message of judgment and rescue Lot and his family from the destruction of the city. The angels arrived in Sodom to investigate the city's wickedness and see if there were any righteous people there. Lot, Abraham's nephew, welcomed the angels into his home and offered them hospitality, as was customary in that culture. However, the men of the city soon discovered the presence of the angels and demanded that Lot send them out so that they could have sex with them. Lot, in an attempt to protect the angels, offered his own daughters to the men instead, but they refused and tried to force their way into Lot's home. At this point, the angels intervened and struck the men with blindness, preventing them from entering the house. The angels then urged Lot and his family to flee the city before it was destroyed. The angels' function in this passage was therefore to deliver a message of judgment on the city of Sodom and to rescue Lot and his family from destruction. They also demonstrated God's mercy by providing a way of escape for Lot and his family. The story of the angels in Genesis 19:1-22 also serves as a warning about the consequences of sin and the importance of following God's commands. It shows that God will not tolerate wickedness forever and that there are consequences for our actions. At the same time, it demonstrates God's mercy and grace, as He provided a way of escape for Lot and his family.

Lessons:

The consequences of sin: The story highlights the devastating consequences of sin and the way it can lead to destruction. The city of Sodom was destroyed because of its wickedness and refusal to turn away from its sinful practices.
The importance of hospitality: The story emphasizes the importance of hospitality and the value of welcoming strangers into our homes. Lot's decision to offer hospitality to the angels, despite the risks involved, showed his generosity and kindness.
The power of prayer: Lot's decision to pray to God for help when he was in trouble demonstrates the power of prayer and the importance of relying on God in difficult situations.
The consequences of compromise: Lot's decision to offer his daughters to the men of the city rather than allow harm to come to his guests shows the dangers of compromise and the compromises we make when we try to avoid difficult situations.
The importance of obedience: The story highlights the importance of obedience to God's commands and the consequences of disobedience. Lot's wife looked back when she was told not to and was turned into a pillar of salt as a result.

The story serves as a warning about the consequences of sin and the importance of living a righteous life. It also highlights the importance of showing kindness and hospitality to others, relying on God in difficult situations, and obeying His commands.

References:

There are several other parts of the Bible that reference Genesis 19:1-22, which describes the visitation of the two angels to Lot and the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah:

2 Peter 2:4-10 - This passage references the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah as an example of the judgment that will come upon the ungodly, and mentions Lot as a righteous man who was rescued from the destruction.

Jude 1:7 - "In a similar way, Sodom and Gomorrah and the surrounding towns gave themselves up to sexual immorality and perversion. They serve as an example of those who suffer the punishment of eternal fire." This passage also references the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah as an example of the judgment that will come upon the ungodly.

Luke 17:28-29 - "It was the same in the days of Lot. People were eating and drinking, buying and selling, planting and building. But the day Lot left Sodom, fire and sulfur rained down from heaven and destroyed them all." This passage references the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah and the warning to be prepared for the coming of the Son of Man.

Matthew 10:15 - "Truly I tell you, it will be more bearable for Sodom and Gomorrah on the day of judgment than for that town." This passage references the judgment that will come upon those who reject the message of the Gospel, and compares it to the judgment that came upon Sodom and Gomorrah.

These references highlight the consequences of sin and the importance of righteousness and repentance. They also demonstrate how events and themes in the Bible are often interconnected and build upon each other to convey a message of faith and salvation.

Genesis 21:17 

 "God heard the boy crying, and the angel of God called to Hagar from heaven and said to her, 'What is the matter, Hagar? Do not be afraid; God has heard the boy crying as he lies there.'"

The mission of the angel was to provide comfort, assurance, and guidance to Hagar and her son Ishmael, who had been sent away by Abraham at the urging of his wife Sarah. Hagar and her son were wandering in the desert with limited provisions when they ran out of water. In her distress, Hagar placed her son under a bush and went a distance away so she wouldn't have to watch him die of thirst. It was at this point that the angel of God appeared to her and spoke to her. The angel comforted Hagar by telling her not to be afraid and promising to make a great nation from her son Ishmael. The angel also provided guidance by telling Hagar where to find water to save her son's life. The function of the angel in this passage, therefore, was to provide comfort and assurance to Hagar in her distress and to guide her and her son to safety. The story highlights God's compassion and concern for even the most vulnerable and marginalized members of society and serves as a reminder that God is always with us, even in our darkest moments.

Lessons:

God's compassion for the vulnerable: The story highlights God's compassion and concern for even the most vulnerable members of society. Hagar and Ishmael were outcasts, having been sent away by Abraham and Sarah, but God saw their plight and intervened to save them.
The importance of trusting in God: Hagar's distress at the prospect of her son dying of thirst in the desert is understandable, but she trusted in God's promise to make a great nation from her son and was rewarded with the guidance she needed to save his life. The story reminds us of the importance of trusting in God and His promises, even when our circumstances seem dire.
The consequences of human actions: The story also serves as a reminder of the consequences of human actions. Hagar and Ishmael were sent away by Abraham and Sarah due to their own actions, but God still intervened to save them. This highlights the importance of taking responsibility for our actions and being mindful of their impact on others.
The power of prayer: The story emphasizes the power of prayer and the importance of turning to God in times of need. Hagar's distress led her to cry out to God, and He answered her prayers by sending the angel to comfort and guide her.

The story teaches us about God's compassion, the importance of trusting in Him, taking responsibility for our actions, and the power of prayer. It also serves as a reminder that God is always with us, even in our darkest moments.

Genesis 22:11-12 

 "But the angel of the Lord called out to him from heaven, 'Abraham! Abraham!' 'Here I am,' he replied. 'Do not lay a hand on the boy,' he said. 'Do not do anything to him. Now I know that you fear God, because you have not withheld from me your son, your only son.'"

In Genesis 22:11-12, the angel's mission or task was to stop Abraham from sacrificing his son Isaac on the altar. When Abraham was about to kill his son as a sacrifice to God, the angel of the Lord called out to him from heaven and said, "Abraham, Abraham!" And Abraham responded, "Here I am."

The angel then said, "Do not lay your hand on the boy or do anything to him, for now I know that you fear God, seeing you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me." The angel's task was to intervene and prevent Abraham from completing the act of sacrificing his son, and to confirm Abraham's faith and obedience to God.

Lessons:

Obedience to God: Abraham's willingness to obey God's command, even when it was difficult and seemed to contradict God's promise to make his descendants into a great nation through Isaac, shows the importance of trusting and obeying God's will.
Faith: Abraham's faith in God's goodness and power is evident in his willingness to offer his son as a sacrifice. He trusted that God would provide for him and keep his promises, even if it meant sacrificing something precious to him.
Provision: God provided a ram as a substitute for Isaac, demonstrating his provision and faithfulness to those who trust and obey him.
Sacrifice: The story also teaches about the concept of sacrifice, that sometimes we must give up something we love or value in order to honor God and follow his will.

Was it evil by god to ask Abraham to sacrifice his son?

There is debate among scholars and theologians about whether God asking Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac was evil. However, it is important to note that the story does not present God as commanding Abraham to actually sacrifice Isaac, but rather as testing Abraham's faith and obedience. In the story, God tests Abraham by asking him to offer his son as a sacrifice, but at the last moment, God intervenes and provides a ram as a substitute. The purpose of the test was to demonstrate Abraham's willingness to obey God, even when it meant sacrificing something precious to him. The story should be understood within the cultural and historical context in which it was written. Child sacrifice was a common practice in many ancient cultures, but the story of Abraham and Isaac demonstrates a rejection of this practice and a recognition of the value of human life. The Bible emphasizes God's love and care for humanity and the importance of faith, obedience, and trust in God's goodness and sovereignty.

Genesis 24:7

 "The Lord, the God of heaven, who brought me out of my father’s household and my native land and who spoke to me and promised me on oath, saying, 'To your offspring I will give this land'—he will send his angel before you so that you can get a wife for my son from there."

In Genesis 24, Abraham sends his servant to find a wife for his son Isaac. The servant asks Abraham about the possibility of the woman not wanting to come with him, and in verse 7, Abraham responds by saying, "The Lord, the God of heaven, who brought me out of my father's household and my native land and who spoke to me and promised me on oath, saying, 'To your offspring I will give this land' - he will send his angel before you so that you can get a wife for my son from there." In this passage, the mission of the angel is to go before Abraham's servant to ensure that he successfully finds a wife for Isaac. The angel is sent by God to assist in this important task and to help ensure that Isaac's lineage and God's promise to Abraham are continued.

Lessons

Trust in God's plan: Abraham trusted in God's promise to give his offspring the land of Canaan. He knew that God would provide a wife for his son Isaac, and he had faith that everything would work out according to God's plan. We too can trust in God's plan for our lives and have faith that He will guide us in the right direction.
Prayer and discernment: Abraham's servant prayed to God for guidance and was discerning in his search for a wife for Isaac. He asked for specific signs to confirm that God had led him to the right woman. We too can pray and discern God's will for our lives, seeking His guidance in all our decisions.
Hospitality and kindness: Rebekah showed hospitality and kindness to Abraham's servant when he arrived in her town. She gave him water to drink and offered to water his camels as well. We too can show hospitality and kindness to others, even strangers, as a reflection of God's love and grace.
Faithfulness and commitment: Rebekah was willing to leave her family and her homeland to marry Isaac, demonstrating her faithfulness and commitment to God's plan. We too can be faithful and committed to God's plan for our lives, even if it means leaving our comfort zones or making sacrifices.

This episode highlights the importance of trusting in God's plan, praying for guidance, showing hospitality and kindness, and being faithful and committed to God's will for our lives.

References: 

In Genesis 50:24, when Jacob was about to die, he reminded his sons of the promise that God had made to his grandfather Abraham and his father Isaac, saying, "God will surely come to your aid and take you up out of this land to the land he promised on oath to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob."

In Exodus 33:2, God reminded Moses of the promise he made to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob to give them the land of Canaan, saying, "I will send an angel before you and drive out the Canaanites, Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites."

In 1 Chronicles 16:15-16, the psalmist recounts the story of God's promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and how God had fulfilled that promise by bringing the Israelites out of Egypt and into the land of Canaan.

In Nehemiah 9:7-8, the Levites who were leading the people in a prayer of confession and repentance before God recalled God's promise to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, saying, "You are the Lord God, who chose Abram and brought him out of Ur of the Chaldeans and named him Abraham. You found his heart faithful to you, and you made a covenant with him to give to his descendants the land of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Jebusites, and Girgashites."

Genesis 24:40 

 "He replied, 'The Lord, before whom I have walked faithfully, will send his angel with you and make your journey a success so that you can get a wife for my son from my own clan and from my father’s family.'"

Mission

In Genesis 24:40, the mission of the angel was to guide and bless Abraham's servant in finding a wife for Isaac. The angel was sent by God to ensure that the servant would find the right woman who would become Isaac's wife and continue the lineage of Abraham's family. The angel's mission included providing divine guidance and protection to the servant during his journey to find a suitable wife for Isaac. Through the angel's guidance and blessing, the servant was able to successfully fulfill his mission and bring back Rebekah as Isaac's wife.

Faith in God's guidance: Abraham's servant trusted in God's guidance to find a wife for Isaac, and the angel's guidance proved instrumental in the success of his mission. The story encourages us to have faith in God's guidance in our lives, trusting that He will provide direction and protection as we seek to fulfill our missions and purpose.

Prayer and discernment: The servant's prayer and discernment in seeking a wife for Isaac demonstrates the importance of seeking God's wisdom and discernment in our decision-making processes. We can learn from the servant's example and seek God's guidance through prayer and seeking His will in our decisions.

God's faithfulness: Throughout the story, God's faithfulness is evident in the fulfillment of His promise to Abraham to bless his family and provide a wife for Isaac. This encourages us to trust in God's faithfulness in our lives, even when circumstances may seem uncertain or challenging.

Honesty and integrity: The servant's honesty and integrity in his dealings with Rebekah and her family demonstrate the importance of integrity and honesty in our relationships with others. We can learn from the servant's example and strive to maintain honesty and integrity in all of our interactions with others.

Lesson:

The lesson that can be learned from Genesis 24:40 is about the importance of honoring and blessing those who do good for us or for others. In this verse, Rebekah's family is not only welcoming the servant into their home, but they are also expressing their gratitude for the good things he has done for them. By blessing Rebekah and her future offspring, they are showing appreciation for the servant's efforts and acknowledging the role he played in bringing Isaac and Rebekah together. In our own lives, it's important to recognize and acknowledge those who do good for us or for others. By expressing our gratitude and offering blessings, we not only show our appreciation but we also contribute to a positive and supportive community. This lesson reminds us that kindness and generosity can create a ripple effect that benefits everyone involved.

There are no direct references to Genesis 24:40 in the Bible, but there are other verses that speak to the importance of showing gratitude and honoring those who do good for us. Here are a few examples:

1 Thessalonians 5:12-13: "Now we ask you, brothers and sisters, to acknowledge those who work hard among you, who care for you in the Lord and who admonish you. Hold them in the highest regard in love because of their work. Live in peace with each other." This verse speaks to the importance of acknowledging and honoring those who work hard and care for us in the Lord. It emphasizes the need for gratitude and respect in our relationships with others.

Proverbs 3:27: "Do not withhold good from those to whom it is due, when it is in your power to act." This verse speaks to the importance of doing good for others and not withholding kindness or help when it is in our power to provide it. It reminds us that showing gratitude and honoring others should be a two-way street.

Romans 13:7: "Give to everyone what you owe them: If you owe taxes, pay taxes; if revenue, then revenue; if respect, then respect; if honor, then honor." This verse emphasizes the importance of giving honor and respect where it is due. It reminds us that we should honor and respect those who have helped us or who have earned our respect in some way.

Genesis 28:12 

He had a dream in which he saw a stairway resting on the earth, with its top reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it.

Mission:

In Genesis 28:12, Jacob had left his home and was traveling to a place called Haran. While he was sleeping with his head on a stone, he had a dream in which he saw a stairway resting on the earth, with its top reaching to heaven. 
The angels in Jacob's dream were not assigned a specific mission or job, but rather were serving as messengers and mediators between God and Jacob. The stairway in the dream represented a connection between heaven and earth, and the angels were using it to travel between the two realms. The dream was a way for God to communicate with Jacob and to reassure him that He was with him and would protect him on his journey.

So, the job of the angel in Genesis 28:12 was to serve as a messenger between God and Jacob, to provide comfort and reassurance, and to facilitate communication between the divine realm and the earthly realm.

Lesson: 

In Genesis 28:12, we read about Jacob's dream where he saw a ladder extending from the earth to the heavens, with angels ascending and descending on it. This dream is significant because it represents God's promise to Jacob that He will be with him and protect him, wherever he goes. One lesson that can be learned from this passage is the importance of faith and trust in God. Despite Jacob's difficult circumstances and his own flaws, he still had faith that God would fulfill His promises to him. This faith enabled him to persevere through trials and tribulations and ultimately led to God's blessings in his life. Additionally, the ladder in Jacob's dream can be seen as a symbol of the bridge between heaven and earth, and the importance of connecting with God in prayer and worship. Just as the angels ascended and descended on the ladder, we too can connect with God through prayer and worship, seeking His guidance and direction in our lives. Overall, the lesson from Genesis 28:12 is to trust in God's promises and to seek Him through prayer and worship, recognizing that He is always with us and will guide us through life's challenges.

References:

John 1:51 - In this verse, Jesus is speaking to Nathanael and says, "Very truly I tell you, you will see 'heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending on' the Son of Man." Jesus is referencing Jacob's dream as a symbol of the connection between heaven and earth that he himself embodies.

Hebrews 1:14 - This verse says, "Are not all angels ministering spirits sent to serve those who will inherit salvation?" This verse implies that the angels in Jacob's dream were serving as ministering spirits to him, providing him with comfort and reassurance.

Genesis 32:1-2 - In this passage, Jacob is returning home to Canaan after many years away, and he has another encounter with angels: "Jacob also went on his way, and the angels of God met him. When Jacob saw them, he said, 'This is the camp of God!' So he named that place Mahanaim." This passage shows that Jacob had a continued awareness and appreciation for the role that angels played in his life, even after the dream in Genesis 28.

Genesis 32:1-2 

"Jacob also went on his way, and the angels of God met him. When Jacob saw them, he said, 'This is the camp of God!' So he named that place Mahanaim."

In Genesis 32:1-2, Jacob is returning home to Canaan after many years away, and he has an encounter with angels. The Bible does not provide a specific mission or job for the angels in this encounter. However, the fact that they met Jacob on his journey home and were identified as "the angels of God" suggests that they were sent by God to provide him with protection, guidance, and reassurance. The encounter with the angels would have been significant to Jacob, as it was a reminder that God was with him and watching over him. Naming the place "Mahanaim," which means "two camps" or "two armies," further emphasizes the idea of divine protection and support in the face of potential danger or conflict. So, while the Bible does not provide a specific mission or job for the angels in this verse, it is likely that their purpose was to serve as messengers and instruments of God's protection and guidance for Jacob on his journey.

Lesson: 

The encounter between Jacob and the angels in Genesis 32:1-2 teaches us several important lessons:

God is always with us: The fact that the angels of God met Jacob on his journey home is a reminder that God is always with us, even in the midst of difficult and challenging circumstances. No matter what we face in life, we can be assured that God is watching over us and providing us with protection and guidance.

We can find comfort in the presence of God: Jacob was comforted and reassured by the presence of the angels of God. In the same way, we can find comfort and peace in knowing that God is with us and that we are never alone.

God's protection is powerful: The naming of the place "Mahanaim," which means "two camps" or "two armies," emphasizes the idea of divine protection and support in the face of potential danger or conflict. We can trust that God's protection is powerful and that He will go to great lengths to keep us safe.

We should be grateful for God's protection and guidance: Jacob's naming of the place "Mahanaim" is an act of gratitude and recognition of God's protection and guidance. We too should be grateful for the ways in which God protects and guides us, and should express our gratitude through prayer and worship.

References:

Hosea 12:3-4 - In this passage, the prophet Hosea refers to Jacob's encounter with the angel and his subsequent wrestling match with God: "In the womb he [Jacob] grasped his brother’s heel; as a man he struggled with God. He struggled with the angel and overcame him; he wept and begged for his favor." This passage emphasizes Jacob's persistence in seeking God's favor and blessing, even in the face of struggle and adversity.

Hebrews 1:14 - This verse says, "Are not all angels ministering spirits sent to serve those who will inherit salvation?" This verse implies that the angels who met Jacob in Genesis 32:1-2 were serving as ministering spirits to him, providing him with comfort and reassurance.

Psalm 34:7 - This verse says, "The angel of the Lord encamps around those who fear him, and he delivers them." This verse emphasizes the idea of divine protection, which is also evident in Jacob's encounter with the angels.

Acts 12:7 - In this passage, the apostle Peter is imprisoned and awaiting trial, when "suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side and woke him up. 'Quick, get up!' he said, and the chains fell off Peter’s wrists." This passage shows how angels continued to play a role in God's work throughout history, including in the New Testament era.

These references demonstrate the significance of Jacob's encounter with the angels in Genesis 32:1-2, and show how it is connected to other stories and themes throughout the Bible.

Exodus

Exodus 3:2-6

 "There the angel of the Lord appeared to him in flames of fire from within a bush. Moses saw that though the bush was on fire it did not burn up. So Moses thought, “I will go over and see this strange sight—why the bush does not burn up.” When the Lord saw that he had gone over to look, God called to him from within the bush, “Moses! Moses!” And Moses said, “Here I am.” “Do not come any closer,” God said. “Take off your sandals, for the place where you are standing is holy ground.” Then he said, “I am the God of your father, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac and the God of Jacob.” At this, Moses hid his face, because he was afraid to look at God."

Mission:

In Exodus 3:2-6, an angel is not mentioned as having a specific mission or job. Instead, it is Moses who encounters the Angel of the Lord in the form of a burning bush while he was tending to his father-in-law's flock in the wilderness.

According to the passage, the Angel of the Lord appeared to Moses in the burning bush, and God spoke to Moses from the midst of the fire. The purpose of the encounter was to commission Moses as God's chosen instrument to deliver the Israelites from their bondage in Egypt and to lead them to the Promised Land.

During their conversation, God revealed to Moses His divine name "I AM WHO I AM" and instructed him to go to Pharaoh and demand that he let the Israelites go. Therefore, the mission of the encounter was to prepare Moses for his role as the leader and deliverer of the Israelites and to convey God's message to him through the Angel of the Lord.

Lessons: 

Firstly, it teaches us that God can use anyone for His purposes, even someone like Moses who had a troubled past and lacked confidence in his abilities.

Secondly, the passage demonstrates God's compassion and concern for His people. Despite the Israelites' disobedience and unbelief, God did not abandon them but instead chose to intervene and deliver them from their bondage.

Thirdly, the passage teaches us about the character of God. When Moses asked for God's name, God revealed Himself as "I AM WHO I AM," which indicates His self-existence, eternality, and faithfulness.

Finally, the encounter between Moses and the Angel of the Lord highlights the importance of obedience to God's call. Moses initially hesitated to obey God's command to go to Pharaoh, but eventually, he trusted in God's promises and led the Israelites out of Egypt. This teaches us that we must trust in God's leading and obey His commands, even if they seem difficult or challenging.

References:

Exodus 3:2-6 is a well-known passage in the Bible, and there are several other verses in the Bible that refer to this event or allude to its significance. Here are a few examples:

In Mark 12:26-27, Jesus references the burning bush when He was answering a question about the resurrection. He says, "But about the dead rising—have you not read in the Book of Moses, in the account of the burning bush, how God said to him, 'I am the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob'? He is not the God of the dead, but of the living. You are badly mistaken!"

In Acts 7:30-34, Stephen, the first Christian martyr, refers to the burning bush in his defense before the Jewish leaders. He says, "After forty years had passed, an angel appeared to Moses in the flames of a burning bush in the desert near Mount Sinai. When he saw this, he was amazed at the sight. As he went over to get a closer look, he heard the Lord say: 'I am the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.' Moses trembled with fear and did not dare to look. Then the Lord said to him, 'Take off your sandals, for the place where you are standing is holy ground.'"

In Hebrews 11:24-26, the author of Hebrews references Moses' encounter with the burning bush as an example of faith. The author says, "By faith Moses, when he had grown up, refused to be known as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. He chose to be mistreated along with the people of God rather than to enjoy the fleeting pleasures of sin. He regarded disgrace for the sake of Christ as of greater value than the treasures of Egypt, because he was looking ahead to his reward."


Exodus 14:19 

 "Then the angel of God, who had been traveling in front of Israel’s army, withdrew and went behind them. The pillar of cloud also moved from in front and stood behind them,"

Mission

This verse describes the movement of the angel of God and the pillar of cloud from the front of the Israelites to behind them as they fled from the pursuing Egyptian army after crossing the Red Sea. It is possible that the mission of the angel was to guide and protect the Israelites as they made their escape. However, the text does not provide any further details about the angel's mission or purpose.

Lesson

This verse comes from the story of the Israelites' escape from Egypt, which is a well-known story in the Bible. The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is always with us and will guide us even in difficult and challenging situations.

In this particular verse, the Israelites were being pursued by the Egyptian army and were trapped between the Red Sea and their enemies. The angel of God and the pillar of cloud moved to stand behind the Israelites, providing protection and guidance for them. This is a powerful reminder that God is always with us, and even in our darkest moments, He is there to guide and protect us.

Furthermore, this verse also teaches us that we should trust in God and have faith in His plan for our lives. The Israelites could have easily panicked and lost hope when they were trapped between the Red Sea and their enemies, but instead, they trusted in God and His plan for their deliverance. As a result, they were able to cross the Red Sea and escape from their pursuers.

In summary, Exodus 14:19 teaches us that God is always with us, and we should trust in His guidance and have faith in His plan for our lives, even in the face of difficult and challenging circumstances.

References

Psalm 77:19-20: "Your path led through the sea, your way through the mighty waters, though your footprints were not seen. You led your people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aaron."

Isaiah 63:11-14: "Then he remembered the days of old, of Moses and his people. Where is he who brought them up out of the sea with the shepherds of his flock? Where is he who put his Holy Spirit in the midst of them, who caused his glorious arm to go at the right hand of Moses, who divided the waters before them to make for himself an everlasting name, who led them through the depths? Like a horse in the desert, they did not stumble. Like livestock that go down into the valley, the Spirit of the Lord gave them rest. So you led your people, to make for yourself a glorious name."

1 Corinthians 10:1-2: "For I do not want you to be unaware, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea, and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea."

Revelation 15:2-3: "And I saw what appeared to be a sea of glass mingled with fire—and also those who had conquered the beast and its image and the number of its name, standing beside the sea of glass with harps of God in their hands. And they sing the song of Moses, the servant of God, and the song of the Lamb, saying, 'Great and amazing are your deeds, O Lord God the Almighty! Just and true are your ways, O King of the nations!'"

Jude 1:5: "Now I want to remind you, although you once fully knew it, that Jesus, who saved a people out of the land of Egypt, afterward destroyed those who did not believe."

Exodus 23:20-23

 "See, I am sending an angel ahead of you to guard you along the way and to bring you to the place I have prepared. Pay attention to him and listen to what he says. Do not rebel against him; he will not forgive your rebellion, since my Name is in him. If you listen carefully to what he says and do all that I say, I will be an enemy to your enemies and will oppose those who oppose you. My angel will go ahead of you and bring you into the land of the Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, Canaanites, Hivites and Jebusites, and I will wipe them out."

Mission

The mission of the angel referred to is to guide and protect the Israelites as they journeyed to the Promised Land. God promised to send an angel ahead of them to guard them on the way and bring them to the place that He had prepared. The Israelites were instructed to pay attention to the angel and listen to what he said, and not rebel against him, because God's name was in him.

The mission of the angel was to lead the Israelites to victory over their enemies, the Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, Canaanites, Hivites, and Jebusites, and to wipe them out, as God had promised to do for His people. The angel's guidance and protection were essential to the success of the Israelites' journey, and they were to trust and obey the angel's words as if they were the very words of God.

Lesson: 

 God sends His angels to guard and guide us, and we should listen to their counsel and follow God's commands. The passage also emphasizes the importance of obedience and trust in God's promises.

In this passage, God promises to send an angel ahead of the Israelites to guide and protect them on their journey to the land He had prepared for them. God instructs the Israelites to pay attention to the angel and to listen to his words, for he speaks with the authority of God. God warns the Israelites not to rebel against the angel, for he will not forgive their rebellion, as God's name is in him.

The passage also contains a promise from God that if the Israelites listen carefully to the angel's words and obey God's commands, He will be an enemy to their enemies and oppose those who oppose them. God assures the Israelites that His angel will go ahead of them and bring them to the land of their enemies, and that He will wipe them out.

In summary, Exodus 23:20-23 teaches us to trust in God's promises and guidance, and to listen to the counsel of His angels. The passage emphasizes the importance of obedience and warns us against rebellion, for disobedience can lead to consequences. Overall, the passage encourages us to have faith in God's plan for our lives and to follow His commands.

References: 

Joshua 5:13-15: "When Joshua was by Jericho, he lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, a man was standing before him with his drawn sword in his hand. And Joshua went to him and said to him, 'Are you for us, or for our adversaries?' And he said, 'No; but I am the commander of the army of the Lord. Now I have come.' And Joshua fell on his face to the earth and worshiped and said to him, 'What does my lord say to his servant?' And the commander of the Lord's army said to Joshua, 'Take off your sandals from your feet, for the place where you are standing is holy.' And Joshua did so."

Psalm 78:52-53: "But he led out his people like sheep and guided them in the wilderness like a flock. He led them in safety, so that they were not afraid, but the sea overwhelmed their enemies."

Acts 7:30-32: "Now when forty years had passed, an angel appeared to him in the wilderness of Mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush. When Moses saw it, he was amazed at the sight, and as he drew near to look, there came the voice of the Lord: 'I am the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob.' And Moses trembled and did not dare to look."

Hebrews 11:28-29: "By faith he kept the Passover and sprinkled the blood, so that the Destroyer of the firstborn might not touch them. By faith the people crossed the Red Sea as on dry land, but the Egyptians, when they attempted to do the same, were drowned."

Revelation 14:6-7: "Then I saw another angel flying directly overhead, with an eternal gospel to proclaim to those who dwell on earth, to every nation and tribe and language and people. And he said with a loud voice, 'Fear God and give him glory, because the hour of his judgment has come, and worship him who made heaven and earth, the sea and the springs of water.'"

Exodus 32:34

"Now go, lead the people to the place I spoke of, and my angel will go before you. However, when the time comes for me to punish, I will punish them for their sin.”

Mission: 

In this passage, the mission of the angel is again to guide and protect the Israelites on their journey to the Promised Land. God instructs Moses to lead the people to the place He had spoken of, and God promises to send His angel before them. The angel's mission was to guide and protect the Israelites from harm and ensure that they arrived safely at their destination.

However, it is important to note that in this passage, God also warns Moses that when the time comes for Him to punish the Israelites for their sin, He will do so. The mission of the angel in this case does not include preventing God from punishing the Israelites, but rather to guide and protect them until that time comes.

Lesson:

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is just and righteous, and sin will not go unpunished. The verse also teaches us the importance of repentance and turning away from sin.

In this verse, God commands Moses to lead the people to the place He had spoken of, and promises that His angel will go before them. However, God also warns that when the time comes for Him to punish, He will punish them for their sin. This serves as a reminder that God's justice is perfect and sin will not go unpunished.

The verse also teaches us about the importance of repentance and turning away from sin. Although God warns of punishment, He also provides a way for the people to avoid it by turning away from their sinful ways and following His commands. In this way, the verse encourages us to recognize our sins and to turn away from them, seeking forgiveness and following God's ways.

In summary, Exodus 32:34 teaches us about God's justice and the consequences of sin, while also emphasizing the importance of repentance and turning away from sin. The verse encourages us to seek forgiveness and to follow God's ways, recognizing that He is just and righteous in all His ways.

References: 

Exodus 33:2: "I will send an angel before you, and I will drive out the Canaanites, the Amorites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites."

Numbers 14:40-44: "And they rose early in the morning and went up to the heights of the hill country, saying, 'Here we are. We will go up to the place that the Lord has promised, for we have sinned.' But Moses said, 'Why now are you transgressing the commandment of the Lord, when that will not succeed? Do not go up, for the Lord is not among you, lest you be struck down before your enemies. For there the Amalekites and the Canaanites are facing you, and you shall fall by the sword. Because you have turned back from following the Lord, the Lord will not be with you.'"

Psalm 78:38-39: "Yet he, being compassionate, atoned for their iniquity and did not destroy them; he restrained his anger often and did not stir up all his wrath. He remembered that they were but flesh, a wind that passes and comes not again."

Amos 5:18-20: "Woe to you who desire the day of the Lord! Why would you have the day of the Lord? It is darkness, and not light, as if a man fled from a lion, and a bear met him, or went into the house and leaned his hand against the wall, and a serpent bit him. Is not the day of the Lord darkness, and not light, and gloom with no brightness in it?"

Hebrews 10:30-31: "For we know him who said, 'Vengeance is mine; I will repay.' And again, 'The Lord will judge his people.' It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God."



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Exodus 33:2

 "I will send an angel before you and drive out the Canaanites, Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites."

Mission:

In this passage, the mission of the angel is to drive out the Canaanites, Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites from the land of Canaan, which God had promised to give to the Israelites. The angel's mission was to help the Israelites conquer and possess the land that God had promised to them as an inheritance.

This passage emphasizes the importance of divine assistance in the Israelites' conquest of the land of Canaan. God promised to send His angel to help them drive out the inhabitants of the land, but the success of their mission was ultimately dependent on the Israelites' obedience and faithfulness to God.

Lesson:

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is a powerful and protective God who provides for His people and guides them to victory. The verse also emphasizes the importance of faith and trust in God's plan.

In this verse, God promises to send an angel before the Israelites to drive out the Canaanites, Amorites, Hittites, Perizzites, Hivites, and Jebusites, who were the inhabitants of the land that God had promised to give to the Israelites. This promise shows that God is a powerful and protective God who provides for His people and guides them to victory.

The verse also emphasizes the importance of faith and trust in God's plan. The Israelites had to trust that God's plan for them was good, even though they were facing formidable enemies in the land that God had promised to give them. By putting their faith in God, they were able to overcome their enemies and claim the land as their own.

In summary, Exodus 33:2 teaches us about God's power and protection for His people, and the importance of faith and trust in His plan. The verse encourages us to put our trust in God and to follow His guidance, even in the face of seemingly insurmountable obstacles. It is a reminder that when we put our faith in God, He will provide for us and guide us to victory.

References:

Exodus 32:34: "Now go, lead the people to the place where I told you. Behold, my angel shall go before you. Nevertheless, in the day when I visit, I will visit their sin upon them."

Numbers 20:16: "And when we cried to the Lord, he heard our voice and sent an angel and brought us out of Egypt. And here we are in Kadesh, a city on the edge of your territory."

Joshua 24:11-12: "And you went over the Jordan and came to Jericho, and the leaders of Jericho fought against you, and also the Amorites, the Perizzites, the Canaanites, the Hittites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites. And I gave them into your hand."

Psalm 78:54: "And he brought them to his holy land, to the mountain which his right hand had won."

Acts 7:30-32: "Now when forty years had passed, an angel appeared to him in the wilderness of Mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush. When Moses saw it, he was amazed at the sight, and as he drew near to look, there came the voice of the Lord: 'I am the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob.' And Moses trembled and did not dare to look."

Numbers

Numbers 20:16

 "And when we cried unto the Lord, he heard our voice, and sent an angel, and hath brought us forth out of Egypt: and, behold, we are in Kadesh, a city in the uttermost of thy border."

Mission: 

The mission/job of the angel was to provide protection and guidance to the Israelites as they fled from the pursuing Egyptian army. The angel is described as moving between the Israelites and the Egyptians, creating a barrier that allowed the Israelites to safely cross the Red Sea on dry ground. 

Lesson: 

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is faithful and will provide for His people in their time of need. The verse also emphasizes the importance of turning to God in times of distress and trusting in His provision.

In this verse, the Israelites are recounting how they cried out to the Lord in their distress and how God answered their prayers by providing water to drink from the rock. This event happened when the Israelites were in the wilderness and were facing a severe water shortage. God instructed Moses to strike a rock with his staff, and water came out of the rock, providing for the Israelites' needs.

The verse teaches us about God's faithfulness and provision for His people. Even when the Israelites were in a difficult situation, God was there to provide for them. This is a reminder that God is always with us, and we can turn to Him in times of need and trust in His provision.

The verse also emphasizes the importance of turning to God in times of distress. The Israelites cried out to the Lord when they were in need, and God answered their prayers. This is a reminder that we should always turn to God in our times of distress and trust in His provision, knowing that He is faithful and will answer our prayers.

References:

Deuteronomy 26:7: "Then we cried to the Lord, the God of our fathers, and the Lord heard our voice and saw our affliction, our toil, and our oppression."

Psalm 106:44-45: "Nevertheless, he looked upon their distress, when he heard their cry. For their sake he remembered his covenant, and relented according to the abundance of his steadfast love."

Isaiah 63:9: "In all their affliction he was afflicted, and the angel of his presence saved them; in his love and in his pity he redeemed them; he lifted them up and carried them all the days of old."

Acts 7:30-34: "Now when forty years had passed, an angel appeared to him in the wilderness of Mount Sinai, in a flame of fire in a bush. When Moses saw it, he was amazed at the sight, and as he drew near to look, there came the voice of the Lord: 'I am the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of Jacob.' And Moses trembled and did not dare to look. Then the Lord said to him, 'Take off the sandals from your feet, for the place where you are standing is holy ground.'"

Hebrews 11:28: "By faith he kept the Passover and sprinkled the blood, so that the Destroyer of the firstborn might not touch them."

Numbers 22:22-35

This is the story of Balaam and his donkey encountering an angel on the road. The angel is not explicitly named as such, but is referred to as "the Lord's messenger" in verse 35.

Mission

The mission of the angel was to prevent Balaam, a pagan prophet, from cursing the Israelites as he had been hired to do by the Moabite king Balak.

According to the text, Balaam was riding on his donkey when the angel of the Lord stood in the path before him with a drawn sword. The donkey saw the angel and turned off the path, crushing Balaam's foot against a wall. Balaam then struck the donkey three times, at which point the donkey spoke and rebuked Balaam for his mistreatment. The angel then revealed himself to Balaam and instructed him to speak only what the Lord commanded him to say.

The mission of the angel was to protect the Israelites from harm by preventing Balaam from cursing them. The incident also served as a reminder to Balaam of his duty to speak only what God commanded him to say.

Lesson

One lesson that can be drawn from this story is the importance of listening to the signs and messages that are presented to us. Balaam was so focused on his mission to curse the Israelites that he didn't notice the angel blocking his path. He was even willing to beat his donkey, who was trying to protect him from harm. Only when the donkey spoke did Balaam finally realize that there was a greater force at work.

This story also emphasizes the idea that sometimes, what we think we want may not be in our best interest. Balaam was offered a great deal of money to curse the Israelites, but in the end, he was prevented from doing so. It is a reminder to be mindful of our own desires and motivations and to consider the impact that our actions may have on others.

Additionally, the story highlights the importance of humility and recognizing our own limitations. Balaam was a skilled diviner, but he was not all-powerful. He was unable to see the angel blocking his path, and it was only through the intervention of his donkey that he was able to realize his mistake.

References

2 Peter 2:15-16 - "They have left the straight way and wandered off to follow the way of Balaam son of Bezer, who loved the wages of wickedness. But he was rebuked for his wrongdoing by a donkey—an animal without speech—who spoke with a human voice and restrained the prophet’s madness."

Revelation 2:14 - "Nevertheless, I have a few things against you: There are some among you who hold to the teaching of Balaam, who taught Balak to entice the Israelites to sin so that they ate food sacrificed to idols and committed sexual immorality."

Joshua 24:9-10 - "Then Balak son of Zippor, the king of Moab, arose and fought against Israel. And he sent and invited Balaam the son of Beor to curse you, but I would not listen to Balaam. Therefore he blessed you greatly, and I delivered you out of his hand."

Nehemiah 13:2 - "Because they did not meet the Israelites with food and water, but hired Balaam against them to curse them—yet our God turned the curse into a blessing."

Numbers 22:31

"Then the Lord opened the eyes of Balaam, and he saw the angel of the Lord standing in the way, and his sword drawn in his hand: and he bowed down his head, and fell flat on his face."

Mission

After the donkey speaks to Balaam, the Lord opens Balaam's eyes and he sees the angel standing in the path with his drawn sword. Balaam bows down and acknowledges the angel's presence. The angel then tells Balaam that he should only speak the words that the Lord has put in his mouth.

The mission of the angel in this passage is to reinforce the message he delivered earlier and to remind Balaam of the consequences of disobeying God's commands. The angel's appearance and words serve as a warning to Balaam that he must speak only what God has instructed him to say, and that he must not attempt to curse the Israelites.

Lesson

One lesson that can be learned from this verse is the importance of being open to God's guidance and direction in our lives. Balaam had been stubbornly resisting God's will, and even though he was a prophet, he was not listening to God's voice. However, in this moment, God opened his eyes and allowed him to see the angel of the Lord standing in his way. This experience humbled Balaam and caused him to submit to God's will.

Another lesson from this verse is the importance of recognizing and respecting God's power and authority. The angel of the Lord was a powerful and intimidating figure, and when Balaam saw him, he immediately fell facedown in awe and respect. This serves as a reminder that we should always approach God with humility and reverence, recognizing that He is the one who holds ultimate power and authority over our lives.

References

2 Peter 2:15-16 - "They have left the straight way and wandered off to follow the way of Balaam son of Bezer, who loved the wages of wickedness. But he was rebuked for his wrongdoing by a donkey—an animal without speech—who spoke with a human voice and restrained the prophet’s madness."

Jude 1:11 - "Woe to them! They have taken the way of Cain; they have rushed for profit into Balaam’s error; they have been destroyed in Korah’s rebellion."

Revelation 2:14 - "Nevertheless, I have a few things against you: There are some among you who hold to the teaching of Balaam, who taught Balak to entice the Israelites to sin so that they ate food sacrificed to idols and committed sexual immorality."

Numbers 22:32

"And the angel of the Lord said unto him, Wherefore hast thou smitten thine ass these three times? behold, I went out to withstand thee, because thy way is perverse before me."

Mission

When Balaam sees the angel standing in the path with his drawn sword, he falls to the ground and bows low. The angel then asks Balaam why he struck his donkey three times, and reminds him that the donkey had saved his life by turning aside from the angel's path. The angel then tells Balaam that he has come to oppose him because his path is reckless and contrary to God's will.

The mission of the angel in this passage is to warn Balaam that he is acting recklessly and against God's will, and to remind him that his mission is not to curse the Israelites but to speak only the words that God has given him to say. The angel's message is a stern warning to Balaam to take his mission seriously and to submit himself to God's will.

Lesson

One lesson that can be learned from this verse is the importance of being aware of our own behavior and the consequences of our actions. In this case, Balaam was so focused on his own desires and agenda that he didn't realize he was mistreating his donkey. The angel of the Lord intervened to show him the error of his ways and to warn him that his path was leading him towards danger.

Another lesson from this verse is the importance of being open to correction and guidance from others, even when it may come in unexpected ways. Balaam may not have expected to be corrected by a talking donkey, but he was willing to listen when the angel of the Lord used the donkey to get his attention. This serves as a reminder that God can use any means necessary to get our attention and guide us on the right path.

Overall, Numbers 22:32 teaches us about the importance of being aware of our actions and open to correction and guidance from God and others.

References

2 Peter 2:15-16 - "They have followed the way of Balaam, the son of Beor, who loved gain from wrongdoing, but was rebuked for his own transgression; a speechless donkey spoke with human voice and restrained the prophet’s madness."

Jude 1:11 - "Woe to them! For they walked in the way of Cain and abandoned themselves for the sake of gain to Balaam's error and perished in Korah's rebellion."

Revelation 2:14 - "But I have a few things against you: you have some there who hold the teaching of Balaam, who taught Balak to put a stumbling block before the sons of Israel, so that they might eat food sacrificed to idols and practice sexual immorality."

Numbers 22:34

"And Balaam said unto the angel of the Lord, I have sinned; for I knew not that thou stoodest in the way against me: now therefore, if it displease thee, I will get me back again."

Mission

Specifically, when Balaam was riding on his donkey and heading towards the Israelites, the donkey saw the angel standing in the way with a drawn sword. The donkey veered off the path, crushing Balaam's foot against a wall. Balaam became angry and began to beat the donkey. Finally, God opened the donkey's mouth, and it spoke to Balaam, asking him why he was beating it. It was at that point that Balaam saw the angel and realized why his donkey had been acting so strangely. The angel then warned Balaam not to curse the Israelites but to bless them instead.

In summary, the mission of the angel in Numbers 22:34 was to block Balaam's path, warn him not to curse the Israelites, and ultimately guide him towards blessing them.

Lesson

The lesson that can be drawn from this passage is that sometimes we may be blinded by our own desires and fail to see the obstacles in our way. Like Balaam, we may become frustrated and even resort to harmful behavior when things don't go as planned. However, it's important to remember that obstacles may be put in our path for a reason, and it's important to take a step back and reassess our goals and actions. Additionally, the passage can remind us to be kind and compassionate to all beings, as even a humble donkey can be an instrument of divine intervention.

References

Joshua 13:22 - "Balaam also, the son of Beor, the one who practiced divination, was killed with the sword by the people of Israel among the rest of their slain."

Nehemiah 13:2 - "For they did not meet the people of Israel with bread and water, but hired Balaam against them to curse them—yet our God turned the curse into a blessing."

2 Peter 2:15 - "They have followed the way of Balaam, the son of Beor, who loved gain from wrongdoing,"

Numbers 22:35

"And the angel of the Lord said unto Balaam, Go with the men: but only the word that I shall speak unto thee, that thou shalt speak. So Balaam went with the princes of Balak."

Mission

The angel continues to reiterate the message to Balaam, instructing him to only speak the words that God puts in his mouth. The angel tells Balaam that he must bless the Israelites and not curse them.

Lesson

Mistreating animals is not only cruel but can also lead to negative consequences for ourselves. The donkey's actions saved Balaam's life, despite being mistreated by him. This verse can remind us to treat all creatures with kindness and respect, recognizing that they too have a purpose and may even be instruments of divine intervention in our lives. Furthermore, it highlights the importance of recognizing and acknowledging our own mistakes and shortcomings, even if it may be difficult or uncomfortable to do so.

References

Joshua 13:22 - "Balaam also, the son of Beor, the one who practiced divination, was killed with the sword by the people of Israel among the rest of their slain."

Nehemiah 13:2 - "For they did not meet the people of Israel with bread and water, but hired Balaam against them to curse them—yet our God turned the curse into a blessing."

2 Peter 2:15 - "They have followed the way of Balaam, the son of Beor, who loved gain from wrongdoing,"

Revelation 2:14 - "But I have a few things against you: you have some there who hold the teaching of Balaam, who taught Balak to put a stumbling block before the sons of Israel, so that they might eat food sacrificed to idols and practice sexual immorality."

2 Samuel

2 Samuel 22:11

"And he rode upon a cherub, and did fly: and he was seen upon the wings of the wind."

Mission

This verse is a metaphorical description of God's intervention on David's behalf. The "cherubim" referred to here are winged angelic beings that were often associated with the presence of God in the Old Testament. The image of God "mounting" the cherubim and "flying" symbolizes his swift and powerful intervention to rescue David from his enemies. The "wings of the wind" suggest that God's intervention was swift, powerful, and unstoppable.

Lesson

The lesson that can be drawn from this passage is that God's power and protection are limitless. David uses powerful imagery to describe God's intervention in his life, likening it to flying on the wings of the wind. This can remind us that even in the face of seemingly insurmountable challenges or enemies, we can find strength and comfort in our faith and trust in God. Additionally, this passage can serve as a reminder that God's ways are not always predictable or understandable to us, but we can trust that he is always in control and working for our good.

Refererences

This verse is part of a longer song of thanksgiving that King David composed after God delivered him from his enemies. A slightly different version of the song is also found in Psalm 18. Here are some other verses in the Bible that make reference to God riding on cherubim or being carried on the wings of the wind:

Psalm 104:3-4 - "He lays the beams of his chambers on the waters;
he makes the clouds his chariot;
he rides on the wings of the wind;
he makes his messengers winds,
his ministers a flaming fire."

Isaiah 19:1 - "An oracle concerning Egypt.
Behold, the Lord is riding on a swift cloud
and comes to Egypt;
and the idols of Egypt will tremble at his presence,
and the heart of the Egyptians will melt within them."

Ezekiel 10:1 - "Then I looked, and behold, on the expanse that was over the heads of the cherubim there appeared above them something like a sapphire, in appearance like a throne."

Habakkuk 3:8-9 - "Was your wrath against the rivers, O Lord?
Was your anger against the rivers,
or your indignation against the sea,
when you rode on your horses,
on your chariot of salvation?
You stripped the sheath from your bow,
calling for many arrows. Selah"

2 Samuel 24:16

"And when the angel stretched out his hand upon Jerusalem to destroy it, the LORD repented him of the evil, and said to the angel that destroyed the people, It is enough: stay now thine hand. And the angel of the LORD was by the threshingplace of Araunah the Jebusite."

Mission

In this verse, the angel of the Lord was about to strike Jerusalem with a plague as a punishment for David's sin. However, God relented and told the angel to withdraw his hand, which stopped the plague from continuing to spread.

In summary, 2 Samuel 24:16 describes the angel of the Lord being sent to afflict the people of Jerusalem with a plague as punishment for King David's sin of taking a census. However, God relented and stopped the plague from continuing to spread when he commanded the angel to withdraw his hand.

Lesson

The lesson that can be drawn from this passage is that there are consequences to our actions, even when we are in positions of power or authority. David's sin in conducting the census led to a punishment that affected many innocent people. This passage can serve as a reminder that our decisions and actions can have far-reaching consequences and impact those around us. Additionally, the passage can remind us that God's justice and mercy are intertwined. While there are consequences for our actions, God is also willing to extend forgiveness and grace when we repent and seek to make things right.

Refererences

Genesis 16:7-14 - The angel of the Lord appears to Hagar in the wilderness and tells her about the son she will bear.

Exodus 3:2-4 - The angel of the Lord appears to Moses in a burning bush and tells him to lead the Israelites out of Egypt.

Judges 6:11-23 - The angel of the Lord appears to Gideon and commissions him to save Israel from the Midianites.

Matthew 1:20-21 - An angel of the Lord appears to Joseph in a dream and tells him that Mary will bear a son who will save his people from their sins.

2 Samuel 24:17

"And David spake unto the LORD when he saw the angel that smote the people, and said, Lo, I have sinned, and I have done wickedly: but these sheep, what have they done? let thine hand, I pray thee, be against me, and against my father's house."

Mission

2 Samuel 24:17 continues the story from the previous verse, where the angel of the Lord was about to strike Jerusalem with a plague as a punishment for David's sin of taking a census. In this verse, David speaks to the angel and pleads with him to spare the people of Jerusalem.

Here is the specific text of 2 Samuel 24:17 from the New International Version (NIV) of the Bible:

"When David saw the angel who was striking down the people, he said to the Lord, 'I have sinned; I, the shepherd, have done wrong. These are but sheep. What have they done? Let your hand fall on me and my family.'"

David acknowledges his sin and takes responsibility for it, recognizing that the people of Jerusalem should not be punished for his mistake. He offers himself and his family as a sacrifice to God, asking that God spare the people of Jerusalem.

Lesson

The lesson that can be drawn from this passage is that humility and repentance are important when we make mistakes or sin. Despite his position as a powerful king, David recognizes his wrongdoing and takes responsibility for his actions. He humbles himself before God and pleads for mercy on behalf of his people. This passage can remind us that true strength comes from admitting our mistakes and seeking forgiveness and restoration, rather than trying to hide or justify our wrongdoings. Additionally, the passage can remind us that God is willing to extend mercy and forgiveness to those who come to him in humility and repentance.

Refererences

Psalm 32:5 - "I acknowledged my sin to you,
and I did not cover my iniquity;
I said, “I will confess my transgressions to the Lord,”
and you forgave the iniquity of my sin."

Proverbs 28:13 - "Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper,
but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy."

1 John 1:9 - "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness."

James 5:16 - "Therefore, confess your sins to one another and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous person has great power as it is working."

1 Kings

1 Kings 19:5-7

"And as he lay and slept under a juniper tree, behold, then an angel touched him, and said unto him, Arise and eat.
And he looked, and, behold, there was a cake baken on the coals, and a cruse of water at his head. And he did eat and drink, and laid him down again.
And the angel of the LORD came again the second time, and touched him, and said, Arise and eat; because the journey is too great for thee."

Mission

The passage describes the angel touching Elijah and saying, "Get up and eat, for the journey is too much for you." The angel had provided bread baked over hot coals and a jar of water, which Elijah consumed. The angel then touched him again and told him to rest, for the journey ahead was still long.

The mission of the angel, therefore, was to provide Elijah with the sustenance he needed to continue his journey and to encourage him to rest and regain his strength.

Lesson

One lesson we can learn from this passage is that even when we feel alone, afraid, or overwhelmed, God is always with us and will provide for our needs. We can trust in God's faithfulness and love, knowing that He will never leave us or forsake us.

Another lesson we can learn is the importance of taking care of ourselves physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Just as the angel provided food and drink to Elijah, we need to prioritize self-care and seek help when we need it. This may involve reaching out to friends, family, or mental health professionals for support, taking time for rest and relaxation, or engaging in activities that bring us joy and fulfillment.

Overall, 1 Kings 19:5-7 teaches us about God's love, provision, and care for His people, as well as the importance of self-care and seeking help when we need it.

References

Matthew 4:11 - "Then the devil left him, and behold, angels came and were ministering to him."

Hebrews 1:14 - "Are they not all ministering spirits sent out to serve for the sake of those who are to inherit salvation?"

Psalm 91:11 - "For he will command his angels concerning you
to guard you in all your ways."

Acts 12:7-8 - "And behold, an angel of the Lord stood next to him, and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side and woke him, saying, 'Get up quickly.' And the chains fell off his hands."


1 Kings 22:19-22


"And he said, Hear thou therefore the word of the LORD: I saw the LORD sitting on his throne, and all the host of heaven standing by him on his right hand and on his left.
And the LORD said, Who shall persuade Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramothgilead? And one said on this manner, and another said on that manner.
And there came forth a spirit, and stood before the LORD, and said, I will persuade him.
And the LORD said unto him, Wherewith? And he said, I will go forth, and I will be a lying spirit in the mouth of all his prophets. And he said, Thou shalt persuade him, and prevail also: go forth, and do so."

This passage describes a vision that Micaiah had in which he saw the Lord on his throne with the host of heaven standing by him. It also mentions a spirit who came forth and offered to be a lying spirit in the mouths of Ahab's prophets.

Mission

In this vision, Micaiah saw the Lord seated on his throne with the heavenly host, including angels, gathered around him. The Lord asked his council who would entice King Ahab to go to battle and meet his demise. After some suggestions were made, a spirit came forward and offered to be a deceiving spirit in the mouths of Ahab's prophets to lead him into battle. The Lord granted permission to the spirit to deceive Ahab's prophets and lead him to his downfall.

Lesson

The lesson that can be drawn from this passage is that God is sovereign over all things, including the affairs of human beings. Despite the plans and schemes of men, God's will ultimately prevail. Micaiah's prophecy was not what Ahab and his advisors wanted to hear, but it was the truth that God had revealed to him. This passage can serve as a reminder that we must be willing to accept God's will, even when it goes against our own plans or desires. Additionally, it can encourage us to seek God's guidance and wisdom in all our decisions, trusting that his plans are ultimately for our good. Finally, the passage can remind us that we are not alone in our struggles and battles, as God and his angels are always with us, working to accomplish his purposes.

Refererences

Job 1:6-7 - "Now there was a day when the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, and Satan also came among them. The Lord said to Satan, 'From where have you come?' Satan answered the Lord and said, 'From going to and fro on the earth, and from walking up and down on it.'"

Zechariah 3:1-2 - "Then he showed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right hand to accuse him. And the Lord said to Satan, 'The Lord rebuke you, O Satan! The Lord who has chosen Jerusalem rebuke you! Is not this a brand plucked from the fire?'"

Revelation 5:11-12 - "Then I looked, and I heard around the throne and the living creatures and the elders the voice of many angels, numbering myriads of myriads and thousands of thousands, saying with a loud voice, 'Worthy is the Lamb who was slain, to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might and honor and glory and blessing!'"

2. Kings

"And it came to pass, as they still went on, and talked, that, behold, there appeared a chariot of fire, and horses of fire, and parted them both asunder; and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven" (2 Kings 2:11).

"And when the servant of the man of God was risen early, and gone forth, behold, an host compassed the city both with horses and chariots. And his servant said unto him, Alas, my master! how shall we do? And he answered, Fear not: for they that be with us are more than they that be with them. And Elisha prayed, and said, Lord, I pray thee, open his eyes, that he may see. And the Lord opened the eyes of the young man; and he saw: and, behold, the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire round about Elisha" (2 Kings 6:15-17).

There are only two verses in 2 Kings that specifically mention angels, both of which are in the form of chariots of fire and horses of fire. However, it is possible that other angelic beings are present in the stories throughout the book, but are not explicitly identified as such.

What was the function of the angels in these verses?

In the first verse (2 Kings 2:11), the angels (in the form of a chariot of fire and horses of fire) appeared to take the prophet Elijah up into heaven. This was a miraculous event that demonstrated the power and presence of God.

In the second verse (2 Kings 6:15-17), the angels (again in the form of horses and chariots of fire) were sent by God to protect the prophet Elisha and his servant from an enemy army. When Elisha's servant saw the enemy surrounding the city, he was afraid, but Elisha prayed for his eyes to be opened to see the heavenly army of angels that was there to protect them.

In both cases, the function of the angels was to carry out the will of God and demonstrate His power and protection. They served as a tangible manifestation of God's presence and care for His people, and they provided encouragement and reassurance in difficult circumstances.

What lesson can be learned from these two episodes ?

From the first episode (2 Kings 2:11), we can learn that God is powerful and can perform miraculous acts beyond our understanding. The angels in the form of a chariot of fire and horses of fire demonstrated God's power to take Elijah up into heaven. This teaches us that we should trust in God's power and ability to work in our lives and in the world, even when things seem impossible.

From the second episode (2 Kings 6:15-17), we can learn that God is always watching over and protecting His people, even in the face of great danger. The angels in the form of horses and chariots of fire protected Elisha and his servant from the enemy army, showing God's power to protect and provide for His people. This teaches us that we should trust in God's protection and provision, even when we face difficult circumstances and enemies.

Overall, both episodes show us that God is present and active in the world, working to accomplish His purposes and care for His people. We should trust in Him and seek to follow His will in our lives.

1. Chronicles

1 Chronicles 21:18 

 "Then the angel of the Lord ordered Gad to tell David to go up and build an altar to the Lord on the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite."

Mission

In the preceding verses, we see that God was angry with David for taking a census of Israel, and He gave David a choice of three punishments: three years of famine, three months of being defeated by his enemies, or three days of plague. David chose the third option, and God sent a plague that killed 70,000 people in Israel.

As the plague was raging, the angel of the Lord appeared to David and the prophet Gad and instructed them to build an altar to the Lord on the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite, which would stop the plague. David obeyed and built the altar, and the plague was halted.

Lesson

In the preceding verses, we see that David had sinned by ordering a census of Israel, which was against God's command. David's sin resulted in God's wrath being poured out on the people of Israel, and many died as a result. When David saw the angel, he immediately recognized the severity of his sin and sought to make amends by building an altar and offering sacrifices to the Lord.

This passage teaches us that when we sin against God, we must acknowledge our wrongdoing, repent, and seek forgiveness. We cannot earn forgiveness through our own actions, but we can express our remorse and seek God's mercy. Building an altar in this context represented a physical and symbolic act of David's repentance, and it demonstrates the importance of taking concrete steps to make things right with God.

In summary, 1 Chronicles 21:18 teaches us about the importance of repentance, seeking forgiveness, and taking concrete steps to make things right with God when we have sinned against Him.

References

2 Samuel 24:18-19 - "On that day Gad went to David and said to him, “Go up and build an altar to the Lord on the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite.” So David went up, as the Lord had commanded through Gad."

2 Samuel 24:20-21 - "When Araunah looked and saw the king and his officials coming toward him, he went out and bowed down before the king with his face to the ground. Araunah said, “Why has my lord the king come to his servant?” “To buy your threshing floor,” David answered, “so I can build an altar to the Lord, that the plague on the people may be stopped.”

2 Samuel 24:22-25 - "Araunah said to David, “Let my lord the king take whatever he wishes and offer it up. Here are oxen for the burnt offering, and here are threshing sledges and ox yokes for the wood. Your Majesty, Araunah gives all this to the king.” Araunah also said to him, “May the Lord your God accept you.” But the king replied to Araunah, “No, I insist on paying you for it. I will not sacrifice to the Lord my God burnt offerings that cost me nothing.” So David bought the threshing floor and the oxen and paid fifty shekels of silver for them. David built an altar to the Lord there and sacrificed burnt offerings and fellowship offerings. Then the Lord answered his prayer in behalf of the land, and the plague on Israel was stopped."

2. Chronicles

2 Chronicles 32:21 

"And the Lord sent an angel, who annihilated all the fighting men and the commanders and officers in the camp of the Assyrian king. So he withdrew to his own land in disgrace. And when he went into the temple of his god, some of his sons, his own flesh and blood, cut him down with the sword."

Mission

In this verse, the mission of the angel was to strike down the mighty men of valor, leaders, and captains in the Assyrian army, causing them to flee and enabling the people of Judah to be victorious over their enemies. The defeat of the Assyrian army was a miraculous intervention by God, and it demonstrated His power and faithfulness to the people of Judah. The verse also mentions that after Sennacherib returned to his own land, he was killed by some of his own offspring in the temple of his god, which was seen as a further sign of God's judgment against him.

Lesson

In 2 Chronicles 32:21, we see the story of King Hezekiah, who was under siege by the Assyrian king Sennacherib. Hezekiah sought the Lord's help and prayed for deliverance, and God sent an angel who destroyed the Assyrian army. The lesson that can be drawn from this passage is the power of prayer and trust in God's protection.

Hezekiah faced a daunting challenge as the powerful Assyrian army had already conquered many nations, and the city of Jerusalem was surrounded. However, instead of giving in to despair or seeking human assistance, he turned to God in prayer and expressed his trust in Him.

The passage highlights the power of prayer and faith in God, as Hezekiah's prayers were answered with a miraculous deliverance. It also illustrates that we can face seemingly impossible situations, but through prayer and faith, we can overcome them.

Furthermore, the passage shows that when we turn to God for help, He is faithful to answer our prayers and provide for our needs. As we see in Hezekiah's case, God intervened in a powerful way and delivered him from the hands of his enemies.

In summary, 2 Chronicles 32:21 teaches us about the power of prayer, trust in God's protection, and faith in His ability to intervene and deliver us from difficult situations. When we face challenges in life, we should seek God's help and trust in His provision and protection.

References

2 Kings 19:35-37 - "That night the angel of the Lord went out and put to death a hundred and eighty-five thousand in the Assyrian camp. When the people got up the next morning—there were all the dead bodies! So Sennacherib king of Assyria broke camp and withdrew. He returned to Nineveh and stayed there. One day, while he was worshiping in the temple of his god Nisrok, his sons Adrammelek and Sharezer killed him with the sword, and they escaped to the land of Ararat. And Esarhaddon his son succeeded him as king."

Isaiah 37:36-38 - "Then the angel of the Lord went out and put to death a hundred and eighty-five thousand in the Assyrian camp. When the people got up the next morning—there were all the dead bodies! So Sennacherib king of Assyria broke camp and withdrew. He returned to Nineveh and stayed there. One day, while he was worshiping in the temple of his god Nisrok, his sons Adrammelek and Sharezer killed him with the sword, and they escaped to the land of Ararat. And Esarhaddon his son succeeded him as king."



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Mission
Lesson
References

Job

Job 38:4-7 

4 “Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation?
Tell me, if you understand.
5 Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know!
Who stretched a measuring line across it?
6 On what were its footings set,
or who laid its cornerstone—
7 while the morning stars sang together
and all the angels[a] shouted for joy?

Mission

The "morning stars" and "sons of God" referred to in this passage are interpreted by many scholars and theologians as angels. The function of the angels in this passage is not specifically mentioned, but it is implied that they were present and rejoicing at the creation of the world.

Some scholars also suggest that the angels may have played a role in the creation of the world or were involved in some other capacity in the natural world. However, the primary purpose of this passage is to emphasize the greatness and power of God, rather than to provide a detailed explanation of the role of angels.

Lesson

The lesson that can be learned from these verses is that human beings have a limited perspective and understanding, and that God's knowledge and power are beyond our comprehension. It is a reminder of our place in the universe and the importance of humility before God. It is also a call to trust in God's wisdom and sovereignty, even when we do not understand the reasons for our suffering or the ways of the world.

References

Psalm 104:5-6 - "You set the earth on its foundations, so that it shall never be shaken. You cover it with the deep as with a garment; the waters stood above the mountains."

Proverbs 8:22-29 - "The Lord created me at the beginning of his work, the first of his acts of long ago. Ages ago I was set up, at the first, before the beginning of the earth. When he established the heavens, I was there, when he drew a circle on the face of the deep, when he made firm the skies above, when he established the fountains of the deep, when he assigned to the sea its limit, so that the waters might not transgress his command, when he marked out the foundations of the earth."

Isaiah 40:12-14 - "Who has measured the waters in the hollow of his hand and marked off the heavens with a span, enclosed the dust of the earth in a measure, and weighed the mountains in scales and the hills in a balance? Who has directed the spirit of the Lord, or as his counselor has instructed him? Whom did he consult for his enlightenment, and who taught him the path of justice? Who taught him knowledge, and showed him the way of understanding?"

Colossians 1:15-17 - "He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation; for in him all things in heaven and on earth were created, things visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or powers—all things have been created through him and for him. He himself is before all things, and in him all things hold together."

Psalms

Psalm 34:7 
7 The angel of the Lord encamps around those who fear him, and he delivers them.

Mission

The phrase "encamps around" suggests that this divine messenger or representative of God is a protector who is always present, guarding and defending those who fear the Lord. The phrase "delivers them" further emphasizes the protection and deliverance that God provides to those who trust in Him.

Lesson

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God's protection is available to those who put their trust in him and fear him. It is a reminder that believers are not alone in their struggles and that God is always there to help and deliver them from their troubles. It is also a call to faith and trust in God's power and protection, even in the face of difficulties and challenges.

Additionally, this verse highlights the role of angels in God's plan for his people. It suggests that angels are active in protecting and delivering believers, and that they are a powerful and important part of God's divine plan. Overall, Psalm 34:7 teaches believers to trust in God's protection and to be grateful for the role that angels play in his plan for their lives.

References

Psalm 91:11 - "For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways."

Hebrews 1:14 - "Are not all angels spirits in the divine service, sent to serve for the sake of those who are to inherit salvation?"

2 Kings 6:16-17 - "He said, 'Do not be afraid, for there are more with us than there are with them.' Then Elisha prayed: 'O Lord, please open his eyes that he may see.' So the Lord opened the eyes of the servant, and he saw; the mountain was full of horses and chariots of fire all around Elisha."

Matthew 18:10 "Take care that you do not despise one of these little ones; for, I tell you, in heaven their angels continually see the face of my Father in heaven."

Psalm 91:11-12


11 For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways;
12 they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.

Mission

The phrase "he will command his angels concerning you" indicates that God has authority over the angels and can direct them to provide protection to His people. The angels are described as "guarding" believers in all their ways, which suggests that they are present and vigilant to prevent harm from coming to them.

The image of the angels bearing believers up on their hands suggests that God's protection is comprehensive and all-encompassing. The phrase "lest you strike your foot against a stone" indicates that even small or seemingly insignificant dangers are not overlooked by God's protection.

Lesson

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is committed to protecting and guarding his people. It highlights the idea that God sends his angels to watch over believers and to keep them safe from harm. This verse is a reminder that believers are not alone in their struggles and that they can trust in God's protection and care.

At the same time, this verse also suggests that believers have a responsibility to trust in God and to walk in his ways. It speaks of God's protection in "all your ways," suggesting that believers who follow God's path and seek to live in obedience to him will be especially blessed and protected. In this sense, Psalm 91:11-12 teaches believers to trust in God's protection while also taking responsibility for their own actions and choices.

Overall, this verse offers a powerful message of hope and assurance for believers, reminding them that God is always watching over them and protecting them from harm. It encourages them to trust in God's care and to walk in his ways, knowing that he is always with them and guiding them on their journey.

References

Matthew 4:5-7 - Then the devil took him to the holy city and placed him on the pinnacle of the temple, saying to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down; for it is written, ‘He will command his angels concerning you,’ and ‘On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.’” Jesus said to him, “Again, it is written, ‘Do not put the Lord your God to the test.’”

Luke 4:10-11 - "For it is written, ‘He will command his angels concerning you, to protect you,’ and ‘On their hands they will bear you up, so that you will not dash your foot against a stone.’"

Hebrews 1:14 - "Are not all angels spirits in the divine service, sent to serve for the sake of those who are to inherit salvation?"

Psalm 121:7-8 - "The Lord will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life. The Lord will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and forevermore."

Psalm 104:3-4

3 He lays the beams of his upper chambers on their waters. He makes the clouds his chariot and rides on the wings of the wind.
4 He makes winds his messengers, flames of fire his servants.

Mission

In Psalm 104:3-4, the focus is primarily on God's power and sovereignty over the natural elements. The passage does not specifically mention the mission or job of angels.

However, angels are mentioned in other parts of the Bible and are described as serving various roles in God's plan. For example, in the Old Testament, angels are often portrayed as messengers of God, delivering important messages or revelations to human beings (e.g. in Genesis 18, angels visit Abraham to inform him of God's plan to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah).

In the New Testament, angels are often described as ministering to God's people, providing protection and guidance (e.g. in Acts 12, an angel helps Peter escape from prison). Angels are also described as praising and worshipping God (e.g. in Revelation 5, angels and other heavenly beings are depicted as worshiping God and the Lamb).

Lesson

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is a powerful and majestic creator who is in control of all things. It highlights the idea that God is not only the creator of the world but also the sustainer of it, who controls the forces of nature and commands the elements. This verse reminds us that God is not a distant and uninvolved deity, but rather an active and engaged creator who is intimately involved in the world he has made.

At the same time, this verse also suggests that God is not limited by the natural laws that govern the world. It speaks of God riding on the wings of the wind and making his messengers winds and flames, suggesting that God is not bound by the same physical laws that we are. In this sense, Psalm 104:3-4 teaches us to approach God with humility and awe, recognizing his power and majesty and acknowledging that we are mere mortals in the presence of a divine and infinite being.

Overall, this verse invites us to contemplate the wonder and majesty of God's creation, and to recognize the power and greatness of the God who made it all. It encourages us to trust in God's wisdom and sovereignty, knowing that he is in control of all things and that his power is beyond our understanding.

References

Hebrews 1:7 - "Of the angels he says, 'He makes his angels winds, and his servants flames of fire.'"

Isaiah 66:15 - "For the Lord will come in fire, and his chariots like the whirlwind, to pay back his anger in fury, and his rebuke in flames of fire."

Ezekiel 1:4-5 - "As I looked, a stormy wind came out of the north: a great cloud with brightness around it and fire flashing forth continually, and in the middle of the fire, something like gleaming amber."

These verses all speak to the power and majesty of God, who is able to harness the forces of nature for his purposes. He rides on the wings of the wind and makes the clouds his chariot, using the winds as his messengers and fire and flame as his ministers. This imagery reinforces the idea that God is in control of all things and that nothing is beyond his reach or ability to direct.

Isaiah:

Isaiah 6:1-3

1 In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high and exalted, seated on a throne; and the train of his robe filled the temple.
2 Above him were seraphim, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying.
3 And they were calling to one another:
“Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory.”

Angels mentioned in the Bible 32878a10

Mission

In this passage, the prophet Isaiah is describing a vision in which he sees the Lord seated on His throne, surrounded by seraphim. The seraphim are described as having six wings, with two used to cover their faces, two to cover their feet, and two for flying.

The function of the seraphim in this passage is to worship and proclaim the holiness of God. The repetition of the word "holy" three times emphasizes the utter purity and sanctity of God. The phrase "the whole earth is full of his glory" suggests that the worship of God by the seraphim is not limited to the temple, but extends to all of creation.

Lesson

Isaiah 6:1-3 is a powerful passage from the Bible that describes the prophet Isaiah's encounter with God. It says, "In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord sitting on a throne, high and lofty; and the hem of his robe filled the temple. Seraphs were in attendance above him; each had six wings: with two they covered their faces, and with two they covered their feet, and with two they flew. And one called to another and said: ‘Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts; the whole earth is full of his glory.’”

The lesson that can be learned from this passage is that God is holy and majestic, and that he deserves our utmost reverence and respect. It highlights the idea that God is not just a human-like figure or a distant deity, but rather a holy and divine being who is beyond our comprehension. The passage emphasizes the grandeur and power of God, and it invites us to approach him with humility and awe.

Moreover, this passage also reminds us of the importance of worship and praise in our relationship with God. The seraphs in this passage are described as calling out to one another, saying, "Holy, holy, holy is the Lord of hosts." This repetition of the word "holy" emphasizes the sacredness and purity of God, and it suggests that worship and praise are a natural response to the greatness and majesty of God.

References

Revelation 4:8 - "And the four living creatures, each of them with six wings, are full of eyes all around and inside. Day and night without ceasing they sing, 'Holy, holy, holy, the Lord God the Almighty, who was and is and is to come.'"

Psalm 99:1-3 - "The Lord is king; let the peoples tremble! He sits enthroned upon the cherubim; let the earth quake! The Lord is great in Zion; he is exalted over all the peoples. Let them praise your great and awesome name. Holy is he!"

Revelation 5:11-14 - "Then I looked, and I heard the voice of many angels surrounding the throne and the living creatures and the elders; they numbered myriads of myriads and thousands of thousands, singing with full voice, 'Worthy is the Lamb that was slaughtered to receive power and wealth and wisdom and might and honor and glory and blessing!' Then I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea, and all that is in them, singing, 'To the one seated on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever!' And the four living creatures said, 'Amen!' And the elders fell down and worshiped."

Isaiah 14:12-15

12 How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations!
13 You said in your heart, “I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon.
14 I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.”
15 But you are brought down to the realm of the dead, to the depths of the pit.

Mission
This passage is often interpreted as referring to the fall of Satan or a powerful angel who rebelled against God. The figure referred to as the "Day Star" or "son of Dawn" is believed by some to be a reference to Satan, who is described as being cast down from heaven.

The function of this fallen angel in Isaiah 14:12-15 is portrayed as one of rebellion and pride. The angel is described as wanting to exalt himself above God and take God's place. The phrase "I will make myself like the Most High" suggests a desire to be worshipped and to receive the same honor and glory as God.

However, the passage also emphasizes the consequences of this rebellion, with the angel being brought down to Sheol or the pit. Overall, Isaiah 14:12-15 is a cautionary tale about the dangers of pride and the consequences of rebellion against God.

Lesson

Pride and arrogance can lead to downfall and destruction. The king of Babylon is described as being filled with pride and ambition, believing that he can ascend to the heavens and make himself like the Most High. However, his arrogance and self-importance ultimately lead to his downfall and destruction.

Moreover, this passage also serves as a reminder of the importance of humility and submission to God. It emphasizes the idea that we are not the masters of our own destiny, and that we must recognize our dependence on God and submit ourselves to his will. The king of Babylon's downfall is a stark reminder of what can happen when we become too proud and arrogant, and it encourages us to cultivate a spirit of humility and reverence in our relationship with God.

References

Luke 10:18 - "He said to them, 'I watched Satan fall from heaven like a flash of lightning.'"

2 Peter 2:4 - "For if God did not spare the angels when they sinned, but cast them into hell and committed them to chains of deepest darkness to be kept until the judgment..."

Revelation 12:9 - "The great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him."

Isaiah 37:36 (NIV):
36 Then the angel of the Lord went out and put to death a hundred and eighty-five thousand in the Assyrian camp. When the people got up the next morning—there were all the dead bodies!

Isaiah 63:9

9 In all their distress he too was distressed,
and the angel of his presence saved them.
In his love and mercy he redeemed them;
he lifted them up and carried them
all the days of old.

Mission

This passage describes God's care and protection for his people, even in times of affliction and suffering. The phrase "the angel of his presence saved them" suggests that God sent an angel to deliver his people from their troubles.

The function of the angel in this passage is to act as a messenger and agent of God's protection and deliverance. The use of the phrase "the angel of his presence" emphasizes the close relationship between God and the angel, and suggests that the angel is acting on God's behalf.

Lesson

The lesson that can be learned from this verse is that God is a compassionate and loving God who cares deeply for his people. The verse speaks of God's presence in times of distress, and it suggests that God is intimately involved in the lives of his people, sharing in their suffering and providing comfort and salvation in their time of need.

Moreover, this verse also highlights the idea that God is a redeemer, who is willing to go to great lengths to save and rescue his people. It emphasizes the depth of God's love and mercy, and it suggests that God's desire to save his people is motivated by his compassion and concern for their well-being.

References

Hebrews 4:15 - "For we do not have a high priest who is unable to empathize with our weaknesses, but we have one who has been tempted in every way, just as we are—yet he did not sin."

Psalm 91:11-12 - "For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways; they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone."

Exodus 23:20-22 - "See, I am sending an angel ahead of you to guard you along the way and to bring you to the place I have prepared. Pay attention to him and listen to what he says. Do not rebel against him; he will not forgive your rebellion, since my Name is in him. If you listen carefully to what he says and do all that I say, I will be an enemy to your enemies and will oppose those who oppose you."

These verses speak to the idea of God's presence with his

Ezekiel

Ezekiel 1:4-28


4 I looked, and I saw a windstorm coming out of the north—an immense cloud with flashing lightning and surrounded by brilliant light. The center of the fire looked like glowing metal,
5 and in the fire was what looked like four living creatures. In appearance their form was human,
6 but each of them had four faces and four wings.
7 Their legs were straight; their feet were like those of a calf and gleamed like burnished bronze.
8 Under their wings on their four sides they had human hands. All four of them had faces and wings,
9 and the wings of one touched the wings of another. Each one went straight ahead; they did not turn as they moved.
10 Their faces looked like this: Each of the four had the face of a human being, and on the right side each had the face of a lion, and on the left the face of an ox; each also had the face of an eagle.
11 Such were their faces. They each had two wings spreading out upward, each wing touching that of the creature on either side; and each had two other wings covering its body.
12 Each one went straight ahead. Wherever the spirit would go, they would go, without turning as they went.
13 The appearance of the living creatures was like burning coals of fire or like torches. Fire moved back and forth among the creatures; it was bright, and lightning flashed out of it.
14 The creatures sped back and forth like flashes of lightning.
15 As I looked at the living creatures, I saw a wheel on the ground beside each creature with its four faces.
16 This was the appearance and structure of the wheels: They sparkled like topaz, and all four looked alike. Each appeared to be made like a wheel intersecting a wheel.
17 As they moved, they would go in any one of the four directions the creatures faced; the wheels did not change direction as the creatures went.
18 Their rims were high and awesome, and all four rims were full of eyes all around.
19 When the living creatures moved, the wheels beside them moved; and when the living creatures rose from the ground, the wheels also rose.
20 Wherever the spirit would go, they would go, and the wheels would rise along with them, because the spirit of the living creatures was in the wheels.
21 When the creatures moved, they also moved; when the creatures stood still, they also stood still; and when the creatures rose from the ground, the wheels rose along with them, because the spirit of the living creatures was in the wheels.
22 Spread out above the heads of the living creatures was what looked something like a vault, sparkling like crystal, and awesome.
23 Under the vault their wings were stretched out one toward the other, and each had two wings covering its body.
24 When the creatures moved, I heard the sound of their wings, like the roar of rushing waters, like the voice of the Almighty, like the tumult of an army. When they stood still, they lowered their wings.
25 Then there came a voice from above the vault over their heads as they stood with lowered wings.
26 Above the vault over their heads was what looked like a throne of lapis lazuli, and high above on the throne was a figure like that of a man.
27 I saw that from what appeared to be his waist up he looked like glowing metal, as if full of fire, and that from there down he looked like fire; and brilliant light surrounded him.
28 Like the appearance of a rainbow in the clouds on a rainy day, so was the radiance around him. This was the appearance of  the likeness of the glory of the Lord. When I saw it, I fell facedown, and I heard the voice of one speaking.

Mission

In Ezekiel 1:4-28, the passage describes a vision that the prophet Ezekiel had of four living creatures, each with four faces and four wings. These creatures were accompanied by wheels and a throne on which sat the likeness of a man.

While the passage doesn't explicitly mention the mission or job of the angel, it is likely that the creatures and the throne represent the presence of God, and the angelic beings are there to serve and worship Him. This interpretation is supported by the description of the creatures, which are said to have "the likeness of a man" but also have four faces, including that of a lion, an ox, and an eagle, which are commonly associated with angelic beings in Jewish and Christian traditions.

The passage suggests that the angelic beings are powerful and awe-inspiring, with the sound of their wings like the "roar of rushing waters" and their movements like flashes of lightning. However, their ultimate purpose is to be in the presence of God and to carry out His will, rather than to have a specific mission or job in the human sense of the word.

Lesson

God is powerful and majestic: The vision emphasizes the awe-inspiring nature of God, with the throne surrounded by a great cloud and flashes of lightning. This passage emphasizes that God is not just any deity, but a powerful and majestic one.

God's ways are mysterious: The imagery of the four living creatures with the likeness of a man, lion, ox, and eagle is enigmatic and leaves much to interpretation. This suggests that God's ways may be beyond human understanding and that we should approach God with humility and awe.

God is sovereign: The vision of the throne emphasizes God's sovereignty, as it is elevated and surrounded by a great cloud, with the living creatures constantly moving around it. This reminds us that God is in control of all things and that we should trust in his plan.

God's presence is transformative: Ezekiel's vision leaves him trembling and falling on his face, which suggests that encountering God's presence can be a transformative experience. This passage reminds us that encountering God can change us and that we should be open to his work in our lives.

References

Revelation 4:5-6 - "From the throne came flashes of lightning, rumblings, and peals of thunder. In front of the throne, seven lamps were blazing. These are the seven spirits of God. Also in front of the throne there was what looked like a sea of glass, clear as crystal. In the center, around the throne, were four living creatures, and they were covered with eyes, in front and in back."

Daniel 10:5-6 - "I looked up and there before me was a man dressed in linen, with a belt of fine gold from Uphaz around his waist. His body was like topaz, his face like lightning, his eyes like flaming torches, his arms and legs like the gleam of burnished bronze, and his voice like the sound of a multitude."

Isaiah 6:1-4 - "In the year that King Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high and exalted, seated on a throne; and the train of his robe filled the temple. Above him were seraphim, each with six wings: With two wings they covered their faces, with two they covered their feet, and with two they were flying. And they were calling to one another: 'Holy, holy, holy is the Lord Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.' At the sound of their voices the doorposts and thresholds shook and the temple was filled with smoke."

Revelation 1:12-16 - "I turned around to see the voice that was speaking to me. And when I turned I saw seven golden lampstands, and among the lampstands was someone like a son of man, dressed in a robe reaching down to his feet and with a golden sash around his chest. The hair on his head was white like wool, as white as snow, and his eyes were like blazing fire. His feet were like bronze glowing in a furnace, and his voice was like the sound of rushing waters. In his right hand he held seven stars, and coming out of his mouth was a sharp, double-edged sword. His face was like the sun shining in all its brilliance."

Ezekiel 9:1-11

1 Then I heard him call out in a loud voice, “Bring near those who are appointed to execute judgment on the city, each with a weapon in his hand.”
2 And I saw six men coming from the direction of the upper gate, which faces north, each with a deadly weapon in his hand. With them was a man clothed in linen who had a writing kit at his side. They came in and stood beside the bronze altar.
3 Now the glory of the God of Israel went up from above the cherubim, where it had been, and moved to the threshold of the temple. Then the Lord called to the man clothed in linen who had the writing kit at his side
4 and said to him, “Go throughout the city of Jerusalem and put a mark on the foreheads of those who grieve and lament over all the detestable things that are done in it.”
5 As I listened, he said to the others, “Follow him through the city and kill, without showing pity or compassion.
6 Slaughter the old men, the young men and women, the mothers and children, but do not touch anyone who has the mark. Begin at my sanctuary.” So they began with the old men who were in front of the temple.
7 Then he said to them, “Defile the temple and fill the courts with the slain. Go!” So they went out and began killing throughout the city.
8 While they were killing and I was left alone, I fell facedown, crying out, “Alas, Sovereign Lord! Are you going to destroy the entire remnant of Israel in this outpouring of your wrath on Jerusalem?”
9 He answered me, “The sin of the people of Israel and Judah is exceedingly great; the land is full of bloodshed and the city is full of injustice. They say, ‘The Lord has forsaken the land; the Lord does not see.’
10 So I will not look on them with pity or spare them, but I will bring down on their own heads what they have done.”
11 Then the man in linen with the writing kit at his side brought back word, saying, “I have done as you commanded.”

Mission

The mission or job of the angelic beings in this passage is to execute judgment on the city of Jerusalem for its sins and unfaithfulness to God. The six men with weapons of destruction are described as being "slayers" who are commanded to "go through the midst of the city and slay" all those who do not have the mark on their foreheads.

The seventh man, dressed in linen and carrying a writing kit, is likely an angelic figure as well, and his role is to identify and mark those who are faithful and obedient to God, sparing them from the judgment that is about to come upon the city. This mark on the forehead is a sign of protection and salvation, and it serves as a clear distinction between those who belong to God and those who do not.

Lesson

God is just: The vision emphasizes the idea that God will judge the wicked and that those who are righteous will be spared. This passage reminds us that God is just and that there will be consequences for our actions.

God is merciful: Despite the impending judgment, the righteous are given a mark of protection. This suggests that God is merciful and desires to spare those who are faithful to him.

Judgment is coming: The arrival of the six men with weapons of destruction emphasizes the idea that judgment is coming. This passage reminds us that there will be a day of reckoning and that we should live our lives in a way that is pleasing to God.

The importance of righteousness: The marking of the foreheads of the righteous emphasizes the importance of righteousness in God's eyes. This passage reminds us that we should strive to live lives of righteousness and faithfulness to God.

References

Revelation 7:2-3 - "Then I saw another angel coming up from the east, having the seal of the living God. He called out in a loud voice to the four angels who had been given power to harm the land and the sea: 'Do not harm the land or the sea or the trees until we put a seal on the foreheads of the servants of our God.'"

Revelation 9:4 - "They were told not to harm the grass of the earth or any plant or tree, but only those people who did not have the seal of God on their foreheads."

Isaiah 26:20-21 - "Go, my people, enter your rooms and shut the doors behind you; hide yourselves for a little while until his wrath has passed by. See, the Lord is coming out of his dwelling to punish the people of the earth for their sins. The earth will disclose the blood shed on it; the earth will conceal its slain no longer."

Jeremiah 25:29 - "See, I am beginning to bring disaster on the city that bears my Name, and will you indeed go unpunished? You will not go unpunished, for I am calling down a sword on all who live on the earth, declares the Lord Almighty."

Revelation 18:4 - "Then I heard another voice from heaven say: 'Come out of her, my people, so that you will not share in her sins, so that you will not receive any of her plagues.'"

Ezekiel 10:1-22

1 I looked, and I saw the likeness of a throne of lapis lazuli above the vault that was over the heads of the cherubim.
2 The Lord said to the man clothed in linen, “Go in among the wheels beneath the cherubim. Fill your hands with burning coals from among the cherubim and scatter them over the city.” And as I watched, he went in.
3 Now the cherubim were standing on the south side of the temple when the man went in, and a cloud filled the inner court.
4 Then the glory of the Lord rose from above the cherubim and moved to the threshold of the temple. The cloud filled the temple, and the court was full of the radiance of the glory of the Lord.
5 The sound of the wings of the cherubim could be heard as far away as the outer court, like the voice of God Almighty when he speaks.
6 When the Lord commanded the man in linen, “Take fire from among the wheels, from among the cherubim,” the man went in and stood beside a wheel.
7 Then one of the cherubim reached out his hand to the fire that was among them. He took up some of it and put it into the hands of the man in linen, who took it and went out.
8 (Under the wings of the cherubim could be seen what looked like human hands.)
9 I looked, and I saw beside the cherubim four wheels, one beside each of the cherubim; the wheels sparkled like topaz.
10 As for their appearance, the four of them looked alike; each was like a wheel intersecting a wheel.
11 As they moved, they would go in any one of the four directions the cherubim faced; the wheels did not turn about as the cherubim went. The cherubim went in whatever direction the head faced, without turning as they went.
12 Their entire bodies, including their backs, their hands and their wings, were completely full of eyes, as were their four wheels.
13 I heard the wheels being called “the whirling wheels.”
14 Each of the cherubim had four faces: One face was that of a cherub, the second the face of a human being, the third the face of a lion, and the fourth the face of an eagle.
15 Then the cherubim rose upward. These were the living creatures I had seen by the Kebar River.
16 When the cherubim moved, the wheels beside them moved; and when the cherubim spread their wings to rise from the ground, the wheels did not leave their side.
17 When the cherubim stood still, they also stood still; and when the cherubim rose, they rose with them, because the spirit of the living creatures was in them.
18 Then the glory of the Lord departed from over the threshold of the temple and stopped above the cherubim.
19 While I watched, the cherubim spread their wings and rose from the ground, and as they went, the wheels went with them. They stopped at the entrance of the east gate of the Lord’s house, and the glory of the God of Israel was above them.
20 These were the living creatures I had seen beneath the God of Israel by the Kebar River, and I realized that they were cherubim.
21 Each had four faces and four wings, with what looked like human hands under their wings.
22 Their faces had the same appearance as those I had seen by the Kebar River. Each one went straight ahead.

Mission

The mission or job of the angelic beings in this passage is to carry out the will of God and to protect His holiness. They are responsible for the movement of the Lord's throne and for the execution of His judgments. The passage emphasizes the majesty and power of these angelic beings, who are said to be "full of eyes" and able to move in any direction without turning.

As the vision progresses, the cherubim are shown to be intimately involved in the workings of the temple. They are responsible for removing the glory of the Lord from the temple, as a sign of His judgment on the people of Jerusalem, and for returning it to the east gate of the temple. This act symbolizes the withdrawal of God's presence from the temple and from the city of Jerusalem due to the people's unfaithfulness and idolatry.

Overall, the mission or job of the angelic beings in this passage is to carry out God's will and to protect His holiness. They are depicted as powerful and majestic creatures, intimately involved in the workings of the temple and in the execution of God's judgments.

Lesson

God's glory cannot be contained: The departure of God's glory from the temple emphasizes the idea that God's presence cannot be confined to a particular place. This passage reminds us that God is not limited to any one building or structure and that we can encounter him anywhere.

The consequences of sin: The departure of God's glory from the temple is a result of the sin and rebellion of the people. This passage reminds us that there are consequences for sin and that our actions can have a profound impact on our relationship with God.

The importance of repentance: Despite the departure of God's glory, there is still hope for restoration. This passage reminds us that we can repent and turn back to God, and that he is merciful and forgiving.

The sovereignty of God: The vision of the cherubim and the wheels emphasizes the idea that God is in control of all things. This passage reminds us that God is sovereign and that we can trust in his plan, even in difficult times.

References

Revelation 4:6-7 - "In front of the throne there was what looked like a sea of glass, clear as crystal. In the center, around the throne, were four living creatures, and they were covered with eyes, in front and in back. The first living creature was like a lion, the second was like an ox, the third had a face like a man, the fourth was like a flying eagle."

Exodus 25:18-20 - "And make two cherubim out of hammered gold at the ends of the cover. Make one cherub on one end and the second cherub on the other; make the cherubim of one piece with the cover, at the two ends. The cherubim are to have their wings spread upward, overshadowing the cover with them."

1 Kings 8:6-7 - "The priests then brought the ark of the Lord’s covenant to its place in the inner sanctuary of the temple, the Most Holy Place, and put it beneath the wings of the cherubim. The cherubim spread their wings over the place of the ark and overshadowed the ark and its carrying poles."

Isaiah 37:16 - "Lord Almighty, the God of Israel, enthroned between the cherubim, you alone are God over all the kingdoms of the earth. You have made heaven and earth."

Psalm 99:1 - "The Lord reigns, let the nations tremble; he sits enthroned between the cherubim, let the earth shake."

Ezekiel 40:3-4

3 He took me there, and I saw a man whose appearance was like bronze; he was standing in the gateway with a linen cord and a measuring rod in his hand.
4 The man said to me, “Son of man, look carefully and listen closely and pay attention to everything I am going to show you, for that is why you have been brought here. Tell the people of Israel everything you see.”

Ezekiel 42:1

1 Then the man led me northward into the outer court and brought me to the rooms opposite the temple courtyard and opposite the outer wall on the north side.

Ezekiel 43:1-3

1 Then the man brought me to the gate facing east,
2 and I saw the glory of the God of Israel coming from the east. His voice was like the sound of rushing waters, and the land was radiant with his glory.
3 The vision I saw was like the vision I had seen when he came to destroy the city and like the visions I had seen by the Kebar River, and I fell facedown.

Ezekiel 44:1-2 (NIV):
1 Then the man brought me back to the outer gate of the sanctuary, the one facing east, and it was shut.
2 The Lord said to me, “This gate is to remain shut. It must not be opened; no one may enter through it. It is to remain shut because the Lord, the God of Israel, has entered through it.

Ezekiel 48:35 (NIV):
35 “The distance all around will be 18,000 cubits. “And the name of the city from that time on will be: the Lord is there.”

Mission
Lesson
References



Last edited by Otangelo on Thu 16 Mar 2023 - 23:11; edited 5 times in total

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4Angels mentioned in the Bible Empty Re: Angels mentioned in the Bible Fri 10 Mar 2023 - 19:09

Otangelo


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Daniel

Daniel 3:28 - "Then Nebuchadnezzar said, 'Praise be to the God of Shadrach, Meshach and Abednego, who has sent his angel and rescued his servants! They trusted in him and defied the king's command and were willing to give up their lives rather than serve or worship any god except their own God.'"

Daniel 6:22 - "My God sent his angel, and he shut the mouths of the lions. They have not hurt me, because I was found innocent in his sight. Nor have I ever done any wrong before you, Your Majesty.'"

Daniel 7:10 - "A river of fire was flowing, coming out from before him. Thousands upon thousands attended him; ten thousand times ten thousand stood before him. The court was seated, and the books were opened."

Daniel 7:16 - "I approached one of those standing there and asked him the meaning of all this. So he told me and gave me the interpretation of these things."

Daniel 8:15-16 - "While I, Daniel, was watching the vision and trying to understand it, there before me stood one who looked like a man. And I heard a man's voice from the Ulai calling, 'Gabriel, tell this man the meaning of the vision.'"

Daniel 9:21-22 - "While I was still in prayer, Gabriel, the man I had seen in the earlier vision, came to me in swift flight about the time of the evening sacrifice. He instructed me and said to me, 'Daniel, I have now come to give you insight and understanding.'"

Daniel 10:5-6 - "I looked up and there before me was a man dressed in linen, with a belt of fine gold from Uphaz around his waist. His body was like topaz, his face like lightning, his eyes like flaming torches, his arms and legs like the gleam of burnished bronze, and his voice like the sound of a multitude."

Daniel 10:11-12 - "He said, 'Daniel, you who are highly esteemed, consider carefully the words I am about to speak to you, and stand up, for I have now been sent to you.' And when he said this to me, I stood up trembling. Then he continued, 'Do not be afraid, Daniel. Since the first day that you set your mind to gain understanding and to humble yourself before your God, your words were heard, and I have come in response to them.'"

Daniel 10:20-21 - "So he said, 'Do you know why I have come to you? Soon I will return to fight against the prince of Persia, and when I go, the prince of Greece will come; but first I will tell you what is written in the Book of Truth. (No one supports me against them except Michael, your prince.)'"

Daniel 11:1 - "And in the first year of Darius the Mede, I took my stand to support and protect him."

Daniel 12:1 - "At that time Michael, the great prince who protects your people, will arise. There will be a time of distress such as has not happened from the beginning of nations until then. But at that time your people—everyone whose name is found written in the book—will be delivered."

Zephaniah

Zephaniah 3:5 (NIV)
"The Lord within her is righteous; he does no wrong. Morning by morning he dispenses his justice, and every new day he does not fail, yet the unrighteous know no shame. I will remove from this city those who rejoice in their pride. Never again will you be haughty on my holy hill. But I will leave within you the meek and humble. The remnant of Israel will trust in the name of the Lord. They will do no wrong; they will tell no lies. A deceitful tongue will not be found in their mouths. They will eat and lie down and no one will make them afraid."

Haggai

The book of Haggai mentions an angel in chapter 1, verse 13:

"Then Haggai, the Lord’s messenger, gave this message of the Lord to the people: 'I am with you,' declares the Lord. So the Lord stirred up the spirit of Zerubbabel son of Shealtiel, governor of Judah, and the spirit of Joshua son of Jozadak, the high priest, and the spirit of the whole remnant of the people. They came and began to work on the house of the Lord Almighty, their God."

In this verse, Haggai is referred to as the Lord's messenger, and it is implied that he is communicating the Lord's message through divine inspiration. While the verse does not provide much detail about the nature of the angel or how he is communicating with Haggai, it suggests that he is a spiritual intermediary between God and humanity.

Zechariah

Zechariah 1:8-10 - "During the night I had a vision, and there before me was a man mounted on a red horse. He was standing among the myrtle trees in a ravine. Behind him were red, brown and white horses. I asked, 'What are these, my lord?' The angel who was talking with me answered, 'I will show you what they are.'"

Zechariah 1:11-13 - "Then the man standing among the myrtle trees explained, 'They are the ones the Lord has sent to go throughout the earth.' And they reported to the angel of the Lord who was standing among the myrtle trees, 'We have gone throughout the earth and found the whole world at rest and in peace.' Then the angel of the Lord said, 'Lord Almighty, how long will you withhold mercy from Jerusalem and from the towns of Judah, which you have been angry with these seventy years?'"

Zechariah 1:19-20 - "I asked the angel who was speaking to me, 'What are these?' He replied, 'These are the horns that scattered Judah, Israel and Jerusalem.' Then the Lord showed me four craftsmen."

Zechariah 2:3-5 - "While the angel who was speaking to me was leaving, another angel came to meet him and said to him: 'Run, tell that young man, "Jerusalem will be a city without walls because of the great number of people and animals in it. And I myself will be a wall of fire around it," declares the Lord, "and I will be its glory within."'"

Zechariah 3:1-7 - "Then he showed me Joshua the high priest standing before the angel of the Lord, and Satan standing at his right side to accuse him. The Lord said to Satan, 'The Lord rebuke you, Satan! The Lord, who has chosen Jerusalem, rebuke you! Is not this man a burning stick snatched from the fire?' Now Joshua was dressed in filthy clothes as he stood before the angel. The angel said to those who were standing before him, 'Take off his filthy clothes.' Then he said to Joshua, 'See, I have taken away your sin, and I will put fine garments on you.'"

Zechariah 4:1-6 - "Then the angel who talked with me returned and woke me up, like someone awakened from sleep. He asked me, 'What do you see?' I answered, 'I see a solid gold lampstand with a bowl at the top and seven lamps on it, with seven channels to the lamps. Also there are two olive trees by it, one on the right of the bowl and the other on its left.' I asked the angel who talked with me, 'What are these, my lord?' He answered, 'Do you not know what these are?' 'No, my lord,' I replied. So he said to me, 'This is the word of the Lord to Zerubbabel: "Not by might nor by power, but by my Spirit," says the Lord Almighty.'"

Zechariah 5:5-11 - "Then the angel who was speaking to me came forward and said to me, 'Look up and see what is appearing.' I asked, 'What is it?' He replied, 'It is a basket.' And he added, 'This is the iniquity of the people throughout the land.' Then the cover of lead was raised, and there in the basket sat a woman! He said, 'This is wickedness,' and he pushed her back

Malachi

Malachi 2:7 - "For the lips of a priest ought to preserve knowledge, because he is the messenger of the Lord Almighty and people seek instruction from his mouth."

Malachi 3:1 - "I will send my messenger, who will prepare the way before me. Then suddenly the Lord you are seeking will come to his temple; the messenger of the covenant, whom you desire, will come,' says the Lord Almighty."

Malachi 3:18 - "And you will again see the distinction between the righteous and the wicked, between those who serve God and those who do not."

While the term "angels" may not be explicitly mentioned in these verses, some scholars interpret the references to messengers and messianic figures as potentially including angels or heavenly beings.

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5Angels mentioned in the Bible Empty Re: Angels mentioned in the Bible Fri 10 Mar 2023 - 19:56

Otangelo


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New Testament

Matthew

"But after he had considered this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, 'Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit.'" (Matthew 1:20)

"When the magi had gone, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream. 'Get up,' he said, 'take the child and his mother and escape to Egypt. Stay there until I tell you, for Herod is going to search for the child to kill him.'" (Matthew 2:13)

"After Herod died, an angel of the Lord appeared in a dream to Joseph in Egypt." (Matthew 2:19)

"Then the devil left him, and angels came and attended him." (Matthew 4:11)

"For he will command his angels concerning you and will guard you carefully." (Matthew 4:6)

"The angels will come and separate the wicked from the righteous." (Matthew 13:49)

"But Jesus remained silent. The high priest said to him, 'I charge you under oath by the living God: Tell us if you are the Messiah, the Son of God.' 'You have said so,' Jesus replied. 'But I say to all of you: From now on you will see the Son of Man sitting at the right hand of the Mighty One and coming on the clouds of heaven.' Then the high priest tore his clothes and said, 'He has spoken blasphemy! Why do we need any more witnesses? Look, now you have heard the blasphemy. What do you think?' 'He is worthy of death,' they answered. Then they spit in his face and struck him with their fists. Others slapped him and said, 'Prophesy to us, Messiah. Who hit you?' Now Peter was sitting out in the courtyard, and a servant girl came to him. 'You also were with Jesus of Galilee,' she said. But he denied it before them all. 'I don't know what you're talking about,' he said. Then he went out to the gateway, where another servant girl saw him and said to the people there, 'This fellow was with Jesus of Nazareth.' He denied it again, with an oath: 'I don't know the man!' After a little while, those standing there went up to Peter and said, 'Surely you are one of them; your accent gives you away.' Then he began to call down curses, and he swore to them, 'I don't know the man!' Immediately a rooster crowed. Then Peter remembered the word Jesus had spoken: 'Before the rooster crows, you will disown me three times.' And he went outside and wept bitterly." (Matthew 26:63-75)

"The angel said to the women, 'Do not be afraid, for I know that you are looking for Jesus, who was crucified. He is not here; he has risen, just as he said. Come and see the place where he lay. Then go quickly and tell his disciples: "He has risen from the dead and is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him." Now I have told you.'" (Matthew 28:5-7)

Mark

"The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God, as it is written in Isaiah the prophet: 'I will send my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way' – 'a voice of one calling in the wilderness, "Prepare the way for the Lord, make straight paths for him."'" (Mark 1:1-3)

"At once the Spirit sent him out into the wilderness, and he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. He was with the wild animals, and angels attended him." (Mark 1:12-13)

"As soon as they left the synagogue, they went with James and John to the home of Simon and Andrew. Simon's mother-in-law was in bed with a fever, and they immediately told Jesus about her. So he went to her, took her hand and helped her up. The fever left her and she began to wait on them. That evening after sunset the people brought to Jesus all the sick and demon-possessed. The whole town gathered at the door, and Jesus healed many who had various diseases. He also drove out many demons, but he would not let the demons speak because they knew who he was." (Mark 1:29-34)

"A man with leprosy came to him and begged him on his knees, 'If you are willing, you can make me clean.' Jesus was indignant. He reached out his hand and touched the man. 'I am willing,' he said. 'Be clean!' Immediately the leprosy left him and he was cleansed. Jesus sent him away at once with a strong warning: 'See that you don't tell this to anyone. But go, show yourself to the priest and offer the sacrifices that Moses commanded for your cleansing, as a testimony to them.' Instead he went out and began to talk freely, spreading the news. As a result, Jesus could no longer enter a town openly but stayed outside in lonely places. Yet the people still came to him from everywhere." (Mark 1:40-45)

"After six days Jesus took Peter, James and John with him and led them up a high mountain, where they were all alone. There he was transfigured before them. His clothes became dazzling white, whiter than anyone in the world could bleach them. And there appeared before them Elijah and Moses, who were talking with Jesus. Peter said to Jesus, 'Rabbi, it is good for us to be here. Let us put up three shelters – one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah.' (He did not know what to say, they were so frightened.) Then a cloud appeared and covered them, and a voice came from the cloud: 'This is my Son, whom I love. Listen to him!'" (Mark 9:2-7)

"When the Sabbath was over, Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome bought spices so that they might go to anoint Jesus' body. Very early on the first day of the week, just after sunrise, they were on their way to the tomb and they asked each other, 'Who will roll the stone away from the entrance of the tomb?' But when they looked up, they saw that the stone, which was very large, had been rolled away. As they entered the tomb, they saw a young man dressed in a white robe sitting on the right side, and they were alarmed. 'Don't be alarmed,' he said. 'You are looking for Jesus the Nazarene, who was crucified. He has risen! He is not here. See the place where they laid him. But go, tell his disciples and Peter, "He is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him, just as he told you."'" (Mark 16:1-7)

Luke

"In the time of Herod king of Judea there was a priest named Zechariah, who belonged to the priestly division of Abijah; his wife Elizabeth was also a descendant of Aaron. Both of them were righteous in the sight of God, observing all the Lord's commands and decrees blamelessly. But they were childless because Elizabeth was not able to conceive, and they were both very old. Once when Zechariah's division was on duty and he was serving as priest before God, he was chosen by lot, according to the custom of the priesthood, to go into the temple of the Lord and burn incense. And when the time for the burning of incense came, all the assembled worshipers were praying outside. Then an angel of the Lord appeared to him, standing at the right side of the altar of incense. When Zechariah saw him, he was startled and was gripped with fear. But the angel said to him: 'Do not be afraid, Zechariah; your prayer has been heard. Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you are to call him John.'" (Luke 1:5-13)

"In the sixth month of Elizabeth's pregnancy, God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee, to a virgin pledged to be married to a man named Joseph, a descendant of David. The virgin's name was Mary. The angel went to her and said, 'Greetings, you who are highly favored! The Lord is with you.' Mary was greatly troubled at his words and wondered what kind of greeting this might be. But the angel said to her, 'Do not be afraid, Mary; you have found favor with God. You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over Jacob's descendants forever; his kingdom will never end.'" (Luke 1:26-33)

"And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, 'Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.'" (Luke 2:8-12)

"When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, 'Let's go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.' So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger." (Luke 2:15-16)

"On the eighth day, when it was time to circumcise the child, he was named Jesus, the name the angel had given him before he was conceived." (Luke 2:21)

"Now there was a man in Jerusalem called Simeon, who was righteous and devout. He was waiting for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was on him. It had been revealed to him by the Holy Spirit that he would not die before he had seen the Lord's Messiah. Moved by the Spirit, he went into the temple courts. When the parents brought in the child Jesus to do for him what the custom of the Law required, Simeon took him in his arms and praised God, saying: 'Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you may now dismiss your servant in peace. For my eyes have seen your salvation, which you have prepared in the sight of all nations: a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of your people Israel.'" (Luke 2:25-32)

"When Joseph and Mary had done everything required by the Law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee to their own town of Nazareth. And the child grew and became strong; he was filled with wisdom, and the grace of God was on him." (Luke 2:39-40)

"The child's father and mother marveled at what was said about him. Then Simeon blessed them and said to Mary, his mother: 'This child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too.'" (Luke 2:33-35)

"After the Feast was over, while his parents were returning home, the boy Jesus stayed behind in Jerusalem, but they were unaware of it. Thinking he was in their company, they traveled on for a day. Then they began looking for him among their relatives and friends. When they did not find him, they went back to Jerusalem to look for him. After three days they found him in the temple courts, sitting among the teachers, listening to them and asking them questions. Everyone who heard him was amazed at his understanding and his answers. When his parents saw him, they were astonished. His mother said to him, 'Son, why have you treated us like this? Your father and I have been anxiously searching for you.' 'Why were you searching for me?' he asked. 'Didn't you know I had to be in my Father's house?' But they did not understand what he was saying to them. Then he went down to Nazareth with them and was obedient to them. But his mother treasured all these things in her heart." (Luke 2:43-51)

"In the fifteenth year of the reign of Tiberius Caesar—when Pontius Pilate was governor of Judea, Herod tetrarch of Galilee, his brother Philip tetrarch of Iturea and Traconitis, and Lysanias tetrarch of Abilene—during the high priesthood of Annas and Caiaphas, the word of God came to John son of Zechariah in the wilderness. He went into all the country around the Jordan, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins." (Luke 3:1-3)

"In the sixth month of Elizabeth's pregnancy, God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee, to a virgin pledged to be married to a man named Joseph, a descendant of David. The virgin's name was Mary. The angel went to her and said, 'Greetings, you who are highly favored! The Lord is with you.'" (Luke 1:26-28)

"But the angel said to her, 'Do not be afraid, Mary; you have found favor with God. You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over Jacob "In those days Caesar Augustus issued a decree that a census should be taken of the entire Roman world. (This was the first census that took place while Quirinius was governor of Syria.) And everyone went to their own town to register." (Luke 2:1-3)

"And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, 'Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is the Messiah, the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.'" (Luke 2:8-12)

"Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying, 'Glory to God in the highest heaven, and on earth peace to those on whom his favor rests.'" (Luke 2:13-14)

"When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, 'Let's go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.' So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger." (Luke 2:15-16)

"The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told." (Luke 2:20)

"On the eighth day, when it was time to circumcise the child, he was named Jesus, the name the angel had given him before he was conceived." (Luke 2:21)

"When the time came for the purification rites required by the Law of Moses, Joseph and Mary took him to Jerusalem to present him to the Lord (as it is written in the Law of the Lord, 'Every firstborn male is to be consecrated to the Lord'), and to offer a sacrifice in keeping with what is said in the Law of the Lord: 'a pair of doves or two young pigeons.'" (Luke 2:22-24)

"There was also a prophet, Anna, the daughter of Penuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was very old; she had lived with her husband seven years after her marriage, and then was a widow until she was eighty-four. She never left the temple but worshiped night and day, fasting and praying. Coming up to them at that very moment, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were looking forward to the redemption of Jerusalem." (Luke 2:36-38)

"The angel said to her, 'The Holy Spirit will come on you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. So the holy one to be born will be called the Son of God. Even Elizabeth your relative is going to have a child in her old age, and she who was said to be unable to conceive is in her sixth month. For no word from God will ever fail.'" (Luke 1:35-37)

"Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, left the Jordan and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, where for forty days he was tempted by the devil. He ate nothing during those days, and at the end of them he was hungry. The devil said to him, 'If you are the Son of God, tell this stone to become bread.' Jesus answered, 'It is written: ‘Man shall not live on bread alone.’'" (Luke 4:1-4)

"The devil led him up to a high place and showed him in an instant all the kingdoms of the world. And he said to him, 'I will give you all their authority and splendor; it has been given to me, and I can give it to anyone I want to. If you worship me, it will all be yours.' Jesus answered, 'It is written: ‘Worship the Lord your God and serve him only.’'" (Luke 4:5-8 )

"The devil led him to Jerusalem and had him stand on the highest point of the temple. 'If you are the Son of God,' he said, 'throw yourself down from here. For it is written: ‘He will command his angels concerning you to guard you carefully; they will lift you up in their hands, so that you will not strike your foot against a stone.’'" (Luke 4:9-11)

"Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about him spread through the whole countryside. He was teaching in their synagogues, and everyone praised him." (Luke 4:14-15)

"He went to Nazareth, where he had been brought up, and on the Sabbath day he went into the synagogue, as was his custom. He stood up to read, and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was handed to him. Unrolling it, he found the place where it is written: 'The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor.' Then he rolled up the scroll, gave it back to the attendant and sat down. The eyes of everyone in the synagogue were fastened on him." (Luke 4:16-20)

"He began by saying to them, 'Today this scripture is fulfilled in your hearing.' All spoke well of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his lips. 'Isn’t this Joseph’s son?' they asked." (Luke 4:21-22)

"Jesus said to them, 'Surely you will quote this proverb to me: ‘Physician, heal yourself!’ And you will tell me, ‘Do here in your hometown what we have heard that you did in Capernaum.’' 'Truly I tell you,' he continued, 'no prophet is accepted in his hometown. I assure you that there were many widows in Israel in Elijah’s time, when the sky was shut for three and a half years and there was a severe famine throughout the land. Yet Elijah was not sent to any of them, but to a widow in Zarephath in the region of Sidon. And there were many in Israel with leprosy in the time of Elisha the prophet, yet not one of them was cleansed—only Naaman the Syrian.'" (Luke 4:23-27)

"All the people in the synagogue were furious when they heard this. They got up, drove him out of the town, and took him to the brow of the hill on which the town was built, in order to throw him off the cliff. But he walked right through the crowd and went on his way." (Luke 4:28-30)

"Jesus went down to Capernaum, a town in Galilee, and on the Sabbath he taught the people. They were amazed at his teaching, because his words had authority." (Luke 4:31-32)

"In the synagogue there was a man possessed by a demon, an impure spirit. He cried out at the top of his voice, 'Go away! What do you want with us, Jesus of Nazareth? Have you come to destroy us? I know who you are—the Holy One of God!'" (Luke 4:33-34)

"Be quiet!' Jesus said sternly. 'Come out of him!' Then the demon threw the man down before them all and came out without injuring him. All the people were amazed and said to each other, 'What words these are! With authority and power he gives orders to impure spirits and they come out!' And the news about him spread throughout the surrounding area." (Luke 4:35-37)

"

"At sunset, the people brought to Jesus all who had various kinds of sickness, and laying his hands on each one, he healed them. Moreover, demons came out of many people, shouting, 'You are the Son of God!' But he rebuked them and would not allow them to speak, because they knew he was the Messiah." (Luke 4:40-41)

"At daybreak, Jesus went out to a solitary place. The people were looking for him and when they came to where he was, they tried to keep him from leaving them. But he said, 'I must proclaim the good news of the kingdom of God to the other towns also, because that is why I was sent.' And he kept on preaching in the synagogues of Judea." (Luke 4:42-44)

"One day as Jesus was standing by the Lake of Gennesaret, the people were crowding around him and listening to the word of God. He saw at the water’s edge two boats, left there by the fishermen, who were washing their nets. He got into one of the boats, the one belonging to Simon, and asked him to put out a little from shore. Then he sat down and taught the people from the boat." (Luke 5:1-3)

"When he had finished speaking, he said to Simon, 'Put out into deep water, and let down the nets for a catch.' Simon answered, 'Master, we’ve worked hard all night and haven’t caught anything. But because you say so, I will let down the nets.' When they had done so, they caught such a large number of fish that their nets began to break." (Luke 5:4-6)

Luke 7:24 - "This is the one about whom it is written: 'I will send my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way before you.'"

Luke 8:30 - "Jesus asked him, 'What is your name?' 'Legion,' he replied, because many demons had gone into him."

Luke 8:43 - "And a woman was there who had been subject to bleeding for twelve years, but no one could heal her."

Luke 9:26 - "Whoever is ashamed of me and my words, the Son of Man will be ashamed of them when he comes in his glory and in the glory of the Father and of the holy angels."

Luke 12:8 - "I tell you, whoever publicly acknowledges me before others, the Son of Man will also acknowledge before the angels of God."

"So they signaled their partners in the other boat to come and help them, and they came and filled both boats so full that they began to sink. When Simon Peter saw this, he fell at Jesus’ knees and

Luke 8:30 - "Jesus asked him, 'What is your name?' 'Legion,' he replied, because many demons had gone into him."

Luke 24:4-7 - "While they were wondering about this, suddenly two men in clothes that gleamed like lightning stood beside them. In their fright the women bowed down with their faces to the ground, but the men said to them, 'Why do you look for the living among the dead? He is not here; he has risen! Remember how he told you, while he was still with you in Galilee: "The Son of Man must be delivered over to the hands of sinners, be crucified and on the third day be raised again."'"

Luke 24:22-23 - "In addition, some of our women amazed us. They went to the tomb early this morning but didn’t find his body. They came and told us that they had seen a vision of angels, who said he was alive."

Luke 24:36-40 - "While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and said to them, 'Peace be with you.' They were startled and frightened, thinking they saw a ghost. He said to them, 'Why are you troubled, and why do doubts rise in your minds? Look at my hands and my feet. It is I myself! Touch me and see; a ghost does not have flesh and bones, as you see I have.' When he had said this, he showed them his hands and feet."

John

John 1:51 - "He then added, 'Very truly I tell you, you will see heaven open, and the angels of God ascending and descending on the Son of Man.'"

John 5:4 - "for an angel of the Lord went down at a certain season into the pool, and troubled the water: whosoever then first after the troubling of the water stepped in was made whole of whatsoever disease he had."

John 12:29 - "The crowd that was there and heard it said it had thundered; others said an angel had spoken to him."

John 20:11-12 - "Now Mary stood outside the tomb crying. As she wept, she bent over to look into the tomb and saw two angels in white, seated where Jesus’ body had been, one at the head and the other at the foot."

John 20:30-31 - "Jesus performed many other signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book. But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name."

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6Angels mentioned in the Bible Empty Re: Angels mentioned in the Bible Fri 10 Mar 2023 - 20:23

Otangelo


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Acts

Acts 1:10-11 - "They were looking intently up into the sky as he was going, when suddenly two men dressed in white stood beside them. 'Men of Galilee,' they said, 'why do you stand here looking into the sky? This same Jesus, who has been taken from you into heaven, will come back in the same way you have seen him go into heaven.'"

Acts 5:19-20 - "But during the night an angel of the Lord opened the doors of the jail and brought them out. 'Go, stand in the temple courts,' he said, 'and tell the people all about this new life.'"

Acts 10:1-7 - "At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion in what was known as the Italian Regiment. He and all his family were devout and God-fearing; he gave generously to those in need and prayed to God regularly. One day at about three in the afternoon he had a vision. He distinctly saw an angel of God, who came to him and said, 'Cornelius!' Cornelius stared at him in fear. 'What is it, Lord?' he asked. The angel answered, 'Your prayers and gifts to the poor have come up as a memorial offering before God. Now send men to Joppa to bring back a man named Simon who is called Peter.'"

Acts 11:12-13 - "The Spirit told me to have no hesitation about going with them. These six brothers also went with me, and we entered the man's house. He told us how he had seen an angel appear in his house and say, 'Send to Joppa for Simon who is called Peter.'"

Acts 12:6-11 - "The night before Herod was to bring him to trial, Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains, and sentries stood guard at the entrance. Suddenly an angel of the Lord appeared and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side and woke him up. 'Quick, get up!' he said, and the chains fell off Peter's wrists. Then the angel said to him, 'Put on your clothes and sandals.' And Peter did so. 'Wrap your cloak around you and follow me,' the angel told him. Peter followed him out of the prison, but he had no idea that what the angel was doing was really happening; he thought he was seeing a vision. They passed the first and second guards and came to the iron gate leading to the city. It opened for them by itself, and they went through it. When they had walked the length of one street, suddenly the angel left him."

Acts 12:14-15 - "When she recognized Peter's voice, she was so overjoyed she ran back without opening it and exclaimed, 'Peter is at the door!' 'You're out of your mind,' they told her. When she kept insisting that it was so, they said, 'It must be his angel.'"

Acts 27:23-24 - "Last night an angel of the God to whom I belong and whom I serve stood beside me and said, 'Do not be afraid, Paul. You must stand trial before Caesar; and God has graciously given you the lives of all who sail with you.'"

Romans

Romans 8:38 - "For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers."
Romans 9:28 - "For the Lord will carry out his sentence on earth with speed and finality."

1. Corinthians

1 Corinthians 4:9 - "For it seems to me that God has put us apostles on display at the end of the procession, like those condemned to die in the arena. We have been made a spectacle to the whole universe, to angels as well as to human beings."

1 Corinthians 6:3 - "Do you not know that we will judge angels? How much more the things of this life!"
1 Corinthians 11:10 - "It is for this reason that a woman ought to have authority over her own head, because of the angels."

Galatians

Galatians 1:8 - "But even if we or an angel from heaven should preach a gospel other than the one we preached to you, let them be under God's curse!"

Ephesians

Ephesians 1:21 - "far above all rule and authority, power and dominion, and every name that is invoked, not only in the present age but also in the one to come."
Ephesians 3:10 - "His intent was that now, through the church, the manifold wisdom of God should be made known to the rulers and authorities in the heavenly realms."
Ephesians 6:11-12 - "Put on the full armor of God, so that you can take your stand against the devil's schemes. For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms."

Philippians

Philippians 2:9-10 - "Therefore God exalted him to the highest place and gave him the name that is above every name, that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth."

Colossians:

Colossians 1:16 - "For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things have been created through him and for him."

Colossians 2:18 - "Do not let anyone who delights in false humility and the worship of angels disqualify you. Such a person also goes into great detail about what they have seen; they are puffed up with idle notions by their unspiritual mind."

Colossians 2:20 - "Since you died with Christ to the elemental spiritual forces of this world, why, as though you still belonged to the world, do you submit to its rules:"

1 Thessalonians

1 Thessalonians 1:10 - "and to wait for his Son from heaven, whom he raised from the dead—Jesus, who rescues us from the coming wrath."

1 Thessalonians 4:16 - "For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first."

2 Thessalonians

2 Thessalonians 1:7 - "and give relief to you who are troubled, and to us as well. This will happen when the Lord Jesus is revealed from heaven in blazing fire with his powerful angels."

2 Thessalonians 2:7 - "For the secret power of lawlessness is already at work; but the one who now holds it back will continue to do so till he is taken out of the way."

1 Timothy

1 Timothy 3:16 - "Beyond all question, the mystery from which true godliness springs is great: He appeared in the flesh, was vindicated by the Spirit, was seen by angels, was preached among the nations, was believed on in the world, was taken up in glory."

Hebrews

Hebrews 1:4 - "So he became as much superior to the angels as the name he has inherited is superior to theirs."

Hebrews 1:6 - "And again, when God brings his firstborn into the world, he says, 'Let all God’s angels worship him.'"

Hebrews 1:7 - "In speaking of the angels he says, 'He makes his angels spirits, and his servants flames of fire.'"

Hebrews 1:13-14 - "To which of the angels did God ever say, 'Sit at my right hand until I make your enemies a footstool for your feet'? Are not all angels ministering spirits sent to serve those who will inherit salvation?"

Hebrews 2:2 - "For since the message spoken through angels was binding, and every violation and disobedience received its just punishment,"

Hebrews 2:5 - "It is not to angels that he has subjected the world to come, about which we are speaking."

Hebrews 2:7 - "You made them a little lower than the angels; you crowned them with glory and honor"

Hebrews 2:9 - "But we do see Jesus, who was made lower than the angels for a little while, now crowned with glory and honor because he suffered death, so that by the grace of God he might taste death for everyone."

Hebrews 2:16 - "For surely it is not angels he helps, but Abraham’s descendants."

Hebrews 12:22 - "But you have come to Mount Zion, to the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem. You have come to thousands upon thousands of angels in joyful assembly."

James

James 2:19 - "You believe that there is one God. Good! Even the demons believe that—and shudder."

1. Peter

1 Peter 1:12 - "It was revealed to them that they were not serving themselves but you, when they spoke of the things that have now been told you by those who have preached the gospel to you by the Holy Spirit sent from heaven. Even angels long to look into these things."

1 Peter 3:22 - "who has gone into heaven and is at God’s right hand—with angels, authorities and powers in submission to him."

1 Peter 5:8 - "Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour."

2. Peter

2 Peter 2:4 - "For if God did not spare angels when they sinned, but sent them to hell, putting them in chains of darkness to be held for judgment;"

2 Peter 2:11 - "yet even angels, although they are stronger and more powerful, do not heap abuse on such beings when bringing judgment on them from the Lord."

1. John

1 John 4:1-2 - "Dear friends, do not believe every spirit, but test the spirits to see whether they are from God, because many false prophets have gone out into the world. This is how you can recognize the Spirit of God: Every spirit that acknowledges that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is from God,"

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7Angels mentioned in the Bible Empty Re: Angels mentioned in the Bible Fri 10 Mar 2023 - 21:10

Otangelo


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Revelation

Revelation 1:1 - "The revelation from Jesus Christ, which God gave him to show his servants what must soon take place. He made it known by sending his angel to his servant John,"

Revelation 1:20 - "The mystery of the seven stars that you saw in my right hand and of the seven golden lampstands is this: The seven stars are the angels of the seven churches, and the seven lampstands are the seven churches."

Here are the verses in Revelation 2-10 that specifically mention angels:

Revelation 2:1 - "To the angel of the church in Ephesus write: These are the words of him who holds the seven stars in his right hand and walks among the seven golden lampstands."

Revelation 2:8 - "To the angel of the church in Smyrna write: These are the words of him who is the First and the Last, who died and came to life again."

Revelation 2:12 - "To the angel of the church in Pergamum write: These are the words of him who has the sharp, double-edged sword."

Revelation 2:18 - "To the angel of the church in Thyatira write: These are the words of the Son of God, whose eyes are like blazing fire and whose feet are like burnished bronze."

Revelation 3:1 - "To the angel of the church in Sardis write: These are the words of him who holds the seven spirits of God and the seven stars. I know your deeds; you have a reputation of being alive, but you are dead."

Revelation 3:7 - "To the angel of the church in Philadelphia write: These are the words of him who is holy and true, who holds the key of David. What he opens no one can shut, and what he shuts no one can open."

Revelation 3:14 - "To the angel of the church in Laodicea write: These are the words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God's creation."

Revelation 5:2 - "And I saw a mighty angel proclaiming in a loud voice, “Who is worthy to break the seals and open the scroll?”"

Revelation 7:1 - "After this I saw four angels standing at the four corners of the earth, holding back the four winds of the earth to prevent any wind from blowing on the land or on the sea or on any tree."

Revelation 8:2 - "And I saw the seven angels who stand before God, and seven trumpets were given to them."

Revelation 10:1 - "Then I saw another mighty angel coming down from heaven, wrapped in a cloud, with a rainbow over his head, and his face was like the sun, and his legs like pillars of fire."

Revelation 10:5-7 - "And the angel whom I saw standing on the sea and on the land raised his right hand to heaven and swore by him who lives forever and ever, who created heaven and what is in it, the earth and what is in it, and the sea and what is in it, that there would be no more delay, but that in the days of the trumpet call to be sounded by the seventh angel, the mystery of God would be fulfilled, just as he announced to his servants the prophets."

Revelation 11:1-2 - "Then I was given a measuring rod like a staff, and I was told, “Rise and measure the temple of God and the altar and those who worship there, but do not measure the court outside the temple; leave that out, for it is given over to the nations, and they will trample the holy city for forty-two months."

Revelation 12:7 - "Now war arose in heaven, Michael and his angels fighting against the dragon. And the dragon and his angels fought back,"

Revelation 14:6-7 - "Then I saw another angel flying directly overhead, with an eternal gospel to proclaim to those who dwell on earth, to every nation and tribe and language and people. And he said with a loud voice, “Fear God and give him glory, because the hour of his judgment has come, and worship him who made heaven and earth, the sea and the springs of water.”

Revelation 14:9 - "And another angel, a third, followed them, saying with a loud voice, “If anyone worships the beast and its image and receives a mark on his forehead or on his hand,"

Revelation 14:15 - "And another angel came out of the temple, calling with a loud voice to him who sat on the cloud, “Put in your sickle, and reap, for the hour to reap has come, for the harvest of the earth is fully ripe.”

Revelation 14:17-18 - "Then another angel came out of the temple in heaven, and he too had a sharp sickle. And another angel came out from the altar, the angel who has authority over the fire, and he called with a loud voice to the one who had the sharp sickle, “Put in your sickle and gather the clusters from the vine of the earth, for its grapes are ripe.”

Revelation 14:19 - "So the angel swung his sickle across the earth and gathered the grape harvest of the earth and threw it into the great winepress of the wrath of God."

Revelation 15:6-7 - "And out of the sanctuary came the seven angels with the seven plagues, clothed in pure, bright linen, with golden sashes around their chests. And one of the four living creatures gave to the seven angels seven golden bowls full of the wrath of God who lives forever and ever,"

Revelation 16:1 - "Then I heard a loud voice from the temple telling the seven angels, “Go and pour out on the earth the seven bowls of the wrath of God.”

Revelation 16:5-6 - "And I heard the angel in charge of the waters say, “Just are you, O Holy One, who is and who was, for you brought these judgments. For they have shed the blood of saints and prophets, and you have given them blood to drink. It is what they deserve!”"

Revelation 17:1-2 - "Then one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls came and said to me, “Come, I will show you the judgment of the great prostitute who is seated on many waters, with whom the kings of the earth have committed sexual immorality, and with the wine of whose sexual immorality the dwellers on earth have become drunk.”

Revelation 18:1 - "After this I saw another angel coming down from heaven, having great authority, and the earth was made bright with his glory."

Revelation 19:17 - "Then I saw an angel standing in the sun, and with a loud voice he called to all the birds that fly directly overhead, “Come, gather for the great supper of God,"

Revelation 20:1-2 - "Then I saw an angel coming down from heaven, holding in his hand the key to the bottomless pit and a great chain. And he seized the dragon, that ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, and bound him for a thousand years,"

Revelation 20:11 - "Then I saw a great white throne and him who was seated on it. From his presence earth and sky fled away, and no place was found for them."

Revelation 21:9-10 - "Then came one of the seven angels who had the seven bowls full of the seven last plagues and spoke to me, saying, “Come, I will show you the Bride, the wife of the Lamb.” And he carried me away in the Spirit to a great, high mountain, and showed me the holy city Jerusalem coming down out of heaven from God,"

Revelation 22:6-7 - "And he said to me, “These words are trustworthy and true. And the Lord, the God of the spirits of the prophets, has sent his angel to show his servants what must soon take place.” “And behold, I am coming soon. Blessed is the one who keeps the words of the prophecy of this book.”"

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